Connect to share and comment

Sri Lanka claims moral victory from war crimes vote

Sri Lanka tried to claim a moral victory Friday and insisted it would push on with reconciliation efforts after being censured by the UN's top rights body for failing to bring perpetrators of war crimes to justice. The US-initiated resolution was carried at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva Thursday with 23 votes in favour and 12 against. Sri Lankan officials said the fact that another 12 nations abstained meant that a majority of the 47-member council did not support the censure move.

Sri Lanka rejects ;reckless' U.S. criticism of its rights record

By Shihar Aneez and Ranga Sirilal COLOMBO (Reuters) - Sri Lanka rejected U.S. criticism of its human rights record as "grossly disproportionate" on Sunday, a day after a senior U.S. official said Washington would table a U.N. resolution against Colombo. Assistant Secretary of State Nisha Biswal expressed frustration on Saturday over Sri Lanka's failure to punish military personnel responsible for atrocities in a civil war that the government won in 2009 against separatist Tamil rebels.

Sri Lanka shuts down war-time propaganda centre

Sri Lanka said Monday it was shutting down its propaganda centre which distributed information to the media during the separatist war, four years after the end of the conflict. "The ministry of defence has decided to disband the centre," spokesman for the president, Mohan Samaranayake, said, without giving a reason or any details. The Media Centre for National Security was set up in 2006 and released information about the military's final campaign which crushed rebels fighting for a separate homeland for ethnic minority Tamils in 2009.

Commonwealth heads urged to keep up Sri Lanka pressure

Local and international rights groups urged Commonwealth leaders not to relax pressure on Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse to investigate war crimes after they leave a summit in Colombo Sunday. Rajapakse spent much of the three-day summit deflecting calls for an international inquiry into the bloody finale to Sri Lanka's civil war in 2009, in which the UN says as many as 40,000 Tamil civilians may have been killed. London-based Amnesty International said Sri Lanka may regret having hosted the event "which has proved a PR disaster" for Colombo.

Trust us on war crimes probe: Sri Lanka president

President Mahinda Rajapakse said Saturday Sri Lanka must be trusted to conduct its own investigation into war crimes allegations and warned against international pressure on his regime's human rights record. "People in glass houses must not throw stones," Rajapakse said in a press conference in Colombo where he is chairing a Commonwealth summit. The three-day gathering has been overshadowed by allegations of war crimes by his troops at the end of an ethnic war in 2009.

Cameron puts Sri Lanka on notice over war crimes

Britain's David Cameron put Sri Lanka on notice Saturday to address allegations of war crimes within months or else he would lead a push for action at the UN. Speaking at a troubled Commonwealth summit in Colombo, the British premier warned his hosts that pressure over alleged abuses at the end of Sri Lanka's ethnic conflict was not about to go away. But a Sri Lankan minister said Colombo would "definitely" not allow international investigators to conduct a probe on its soil.

Sri Lanka rejects international war crimes probe

A top minister rejected pressure Saturday for an international probe into alleged war crimes at the end of Sri Lanka's ethnic conflict, saying the government would "definitely" not allow one. "Why should we have an internal inquiry? We will object to it ... Definitely, we are not going to allow it," Economic Development Minister Basil Rajapakse, who is President Mahinda Rajapakse's brother, told AFP.

Sri Lanka rejects international war crimes probe

A senior Sri Lankan minister rejected pressure Saturday for an international probe into alleged war crimes at the end of the country's civil war, saying the government would "definitely" not allow it. "Why should we have an internal inquiry? We will object to it ... Definitely we are not going to allow it," Economic Development Minister Basil Rajapakse, who is President Mahinda Rajapakse's brother, told AFP.

Sri Lanka rejects international war crimes probe

A top minister rejected pressure Saturday for an international probe into alleged war crimes at the end of Sri Lanka's ethnic conflict, saying the government would "definitely" not allow one. "Why should we have an international inquiry? We will object to it ... Definitely, we are not going to allow it," Economic Development Minister Basil Rajapakse, who is President Mahinda Rajapakse's brother, told AFP.

Sri Lanka needs to go 'faster' on rights

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron urged Sri Lanka Saturday to move "further and faster" to address allegations of war crimes, saying the issue would remain high on the international agenda. "The Sri Lankan government needs to go further and faster on human rights and reconciliation," Cameron told a press conference at an ongoing Commonwealth summit in Colombo. "I accept it takes time but I think the important thing is to get on the right track," added Cameron who paid an historic visit on Friday to the island's war-torn north.
Syndicate content