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Toyota to pay US $1.2 billion for deadly defect coverup

Toyota Motor Corp. will pay $1.2 billion to settle US criminal charges that it lied to safety regulators and the public as it tried to cover up deadly accelerator defects. The Japanese auto giant eventually recalled 12 million vehicles worldwide in 2009 and 2010 at a cost of $2.4 billion as the scandal over sudden, unintended acceleration spread and tarnished its once-stellar reputation.

Report: US Justice Department, Toyota may reach settlement in unintended acceleration probe

TOKYO - The Wall Street Journal is reporting the U.S. Justice Department may reach a $1 billion settlement with Toyota Motor Corp., ending a four-year criminal investigation into the Japanese automaker's disclosure of safety problems. Toyota declined comment Wednesday on the report, which cited unnamed sources who said a settlement still could fall apart. Toyota said it is co-operating with the U.S. Attorney's office. The U.S. Justice Department was not immediately available for comment.

Courts OK settlement for economic loss in Toyota 'unintended acceleration' case

TORONTO - Courts in four provinces have given the thumbs up to a Canada-wide settlement with Toyota relating to consumer claims for alleged economic loss as a result of unintended acceleration involving certain Toyota vehicles. Lawyers for the plaintiffs said Monday that the settlement for economic loss following certain recalls in 2009 and 2010 does not impact ongoing litigation for personal injury or wrongful death claims related to alleged unintended acceleration.

Avalanche centre issues special warning after 4 deaths over 6 days

REVELSTOKE, B.C. - A warning has been issued by the Canadian Avalanche Centre after four deaths over six days in B.C. and Alberta. Karl Klassen of the Public Avalanche Warning Service says unstable layers of snow have been a significant problem for weeks and areas once considered safe may not be now. Klassen says the two deaths involving snowmobiles in B.C. occurred in forestry cut blocks, where logging had occurred, which means it's no longer safe riding below the treeline.

NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman to leave accident investigations board to head safety council

WASHINGTON - The chairman of the nation's transportation accident investigations board is leaving to become the president and CEO of the National Safety Council. Forty-three-year-old Deborah Hersman said in a blog Tuesday that her nearly 10 years at the National Transportation Safety Board have been "a great ride," but she is moving on to the second "dream job" of her career.

NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman to leave accident investigations board to head safety council

WASHINGTON - The chairman of the nation's transportation accident investigations board is leaving to become the president and CEO of the National Safety Council. Forty-three-year-old Deborah Hersman said in a blog Tuesday that her nearly 10 years at the National Transportation Safety Board have been "a great ride," but she is moving on to the second "dream job" of her career.

Federal program aims to make pet food, livestock feed safer

By P.J. Huffstutter (Reuters) - A new federal program aims to standardize inspection procedures for pet food and farm animal feed produced in the United States, making them safer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Friday. The Animal Feed Regulatory Program Standards comprise a series of new voluntary standards for inspections by state and other regulatory programs that oversee the production of pet food and feed for farm animals such as cattle, chickens and pigs.

Rail safety working group says better funding needed for rail safety improvement

OTTAWA - It is not at all clear that Transport Canada has the resources to approve, inspect and maintain current emergency response plans, let alone enough funding for a recommended expansion of the program, says a government-commissioned rail safety report.

California company recalls 8.7 million pounds of meat products that weren't fully inspected

PETALUMA, Calif. - A Northern California company is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased and unhealthy animals without a full federal inspection, federal officials said Saturday. That's just over a year's worth of meat products processed by Rancho Feeding Corp., which has been under scrutiny by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. The agency said that without full inspection, the recalled products are unfit for human consumption.

Toyota close to $1 billion deal to settle U.S. probe: WSJ

(Reuters) - Toyota Motor Corp <7203.T> is close to a deal to pay $1 billion to settle a U.S. criminal investigation into how it disclosed customers' complaints about unintended acceleration years ago, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday, citing anonymous sources. Toyota could reach a deal with U.S. authorities within weeks, the Journal quoted the sources as saying, ending a four-year probe into one of the Japanese automaker's most embarrassing international episodes.
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