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More work needed to achieve gender equality: Supreme Court chief justice

CALGARY - The head of the Supreme Court of Canada says progress is being made in attracting more women to the legal profession. But Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin told a legal conference in Calgary on Monday that more work is necessary before equality is achieved. McLachlin said that in the past there were always assumptions about the role of women in society and, to some extent, those assumptions are still in effect.

Mexico laments citizen's execution in U.S.

Mexico City, Jan 23 (EFE).- Mexico lamented Texas' execution of a Mexican national and called it a clear contravention of a 2004 world court decision that found U.S. authorities had violated international law by failing to inform foreign suspects of their right to consular assistance. "Mexican Edgar Tamayo Arias was executed today in Texas," Mexico's Foreign Relations Secretariat said Wednesday night, shortly after Texas authorities confirmed that the convicted cop killer had been put to death.

Mexico laments citizen's execution in U.S.

Mexico City, Jan 23 (EFE).- Mexico lamented Texas' execution of a Mexican national and called it a clear contravention of a 2004 world court decision that found U.S. authorities had violated international law by failing to inform foreign suspects of their right to consular assistance. "Mexican Edgar Tamayo Arias was executed today in Texas," Mexico's Foreign Relations Secretariat said Wednesday night, shortly after Texas authorities confirmed that the convicted cop killer had been put to death.

Analysis: In Texas courtroom, a battle resumes over race

By Joan Biskupic AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - Last June the U.S. Supreme Court faced a question it has wrestled with repeatedly for more than a generation: When may universities consider a student's race in making admissions decisions?

U.S. justices decline to hear second Oklahoma abortion case

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a decision striking down a Oklahoma law that required any woman seeking an abortion to be shown an ultrasound image of the fetus beforehand. By refusing to hear the case, the high court left intact an Oklahoma Supreme Court ruling that struck down the law on the basis that it violated the U.S. Supreme Court's precedent on abortion restrictions.

Supreme Court drops abortion case from docket

The US Supreme Court announced without explanation Monday that it will not review an Oklahoma court's decision to overturn a state law that restricts the use of an abortion pill. The court had said in June it would review an appeal by the state of Oklahoma, challenging the state supreme court's decision to overturn the 2011 law.

U.S. justices to hear race case; one side has two voices

By Joan Biskupic WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday will delve into a decades-old debate over university admissions policies that favor racial minorities, hearing a Michigan case that picks up where the justices left off last session in a dispute from the University of Texas. Unlike the Texas case that tested a specific affirmative action practice, this new dilemma revolves around a broad state constitutional amendment.

Roberts: The 'swing' justice of election law

By Joshua A. Douglas

US Supreme Court to revisit abortion ruling

The US Supreme Court and its conservative majority are back in session Monday and will likely weigh in again on the hot-button issue of legalizing abortion. In its last term, the high court presided by George W. Bush appointee Chief Justice John Roberts put its mark on sensitive social matters, such as the right to recite Christian prayers at town meetings or raising the bar for affirmative action in university admissions. Just before its summer recess in late June, the highest court in the land agreed to review two cases on the politically fraught issue of abortion.

Supreme Court stands by existing rules for police searches using sniffer dogs

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada has given police officers the OK to search people's belongings with sniffer dogs as long as they have "reasonable suspicion" they may find illegal drugs. In a pair of decisions released Friday, the high court upheld the current threshold police must meet to use the dogs to ferret out illegal drugs — a standard that some civil-liberties groups argue is already too low.
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