Connect to share and comment

Parched California moves to boost water saving toilets, faucets

By Rory Carroll SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - With California facing its worst drought in a century, state officials have fast-tracked first-in-the-nation water efficiency standards for new toilets, urinals and faucets, an action expected to save about 8.2 billion gallons of water the first year while cutting energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The draft standards, released late last week, would prohibit the sale of appliances in California that do not meet proposed standards, which are expected to go into effect in 2016.

Italian man ends protest on dome of St Peter's Basilica

An Italian businessman ended a three-day protest on the dome of St. Peter's Basilica on Monday, calling on Pope Francis to help victims of Italy's economic crisis. Marcello Di Finizio was swiftly arrested by the Vatican gendarmerie and, according to Italian media, received treatment for a leg injury incurred when he climbed up on to the dome on Friday. "It was really cold and I was dead tired," he wrote shortly afterwards on his Facebook page.

Italy man stages protest on dome of St. Peter's Basilica

An Italian businessman climbed out onto a ledge on the dome of St. Peter's Basilica on Saturday, calling for the pope's help for those hit hard by Italy's deep recession. Marcello Di Finzio unfurled a white banner reading "Help us Pope Francis" and called on the Italian government to end harsh austerity measures in the debt-laden country, which is struggling with high unemployment. "Stop for God's sake, you are killing us all. Give us back our lives," it read.

Italy man stages protest on dome of St. Peter's Basilica

An Italian businessman climbed out onto a ledge on the dome of St. Peter's Basilica on Saturday, calling for the pope's help for those hit hard by Italy's deep recession. Marcello Di Finzio unfurled a white banner reading "Help us Pope Francis" and called on the Italian government to end harsh austerity measures in the debt-laden country, which is struggling with high unemployment. "Stop for God's sake, you are killing us all. Give us back our lives," it read.

Aviva paid out record $190 million in water damage claims last year

CALGARY - Aviva Canada says it paid out a whopping $190 million in water damage claims last year — and the insurance provider says it's part of an upward trend. Severe flooding in Alberta and Toronto had a lot to do with the record amount — but not everything, Aviva said in a release Tuesday. "The flooding in Alberta and Toronto certainly played a big part in the increase, but the general trend is upward. And, as severe weather events are growing in frequency, we expect to see more situations like this in the future," said Wayne Ross, vice-president of property claims.

Japanese architect wins top Pritzker award

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, who uses cardboard tubes to make temporary housing for victims of natural disasters and refugees fleeing violence, has won his field's highest honour, the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Award sponsor The Hyatt Foundation said Monday that it had chosen the 56-year-old architect, who has offices in Tokyo, Paris and New York, as its 2014 laureate.

Japanese architect says not worthy of top prize

The Japanese architect awarded the industry's top prize for his work using cardboard to make temporary housing for refugees and victims of natural disasters said Tuesday he did not feel worthy of the honour. "I haven't achieved that level yet," Shigeru Ban told AFP by telephone from Copenhagen after winning the 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Japanese architect wins top Pritzker award

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, who uses cardboard tubes to make temporary housing for victims of natural disasters and refugees fleeing violence, has won his field's highest honour, the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Award sponsor The Hyatt Foundation said Monday that it had chosen the 56-year-old architect, who has offices in Tokyo, Paris and New York, as its 2014 laureate.

Japanese architect wins top Pritzker award

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, who uses cardboard tubes to make temporary housing for victims of natural disasters and refugees fleeing violence, has won his field's highest honour, the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Award sponsor The Hyatt Foundation said Monday that it had chosen the 56-year-old architect, who has offices in Tokyo, Paris and New York, as its 2014 laureate.

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban awarded 2014 Pritzker prize

(Reuters) - Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, noted for his airy modernist designs and humanitarian work, has won the 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize, the top award in the field, organizers said on Monday. Ban, 56, is the second consecutive architect from Japan to win the $100,000 prize, and the third architect in the past five years from the country as well. Last year's winner was Toyo Ito.
Syndicate content