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Chinese man covered with 460,000 bees for honey stunt

A Chinese beekeeper covered his semi-naked body in more than 460,000 bees for a publicity stunt aimed at selling more of his honey, he told AFP Thursday, using a technique known as "bee bearding". She Ping, a 34-year-old honey merchant from the southwestern Chinese metropolis of Chongqing, covered himself in bees that collectively weighed more than 45 kilograms (100 pounds) in a display for a group of French photographers on Wednesday, he said.

Chinese man covered with 460,000 bees for honey stunt

A Chinese beekeeper covered his semi-naked body in more than 460,000 bees for a publicity stunt aimed at selling more of his honey, he told AFP Thursday, using a technique known as "bee bearding." She Ping, a 34-year-old honey merchant from the southwestern Chinese metropolis of Chongqing, covered himself in bees that collectively weighed more than 45 kilograms (100 pounds) in a display for a group of French photographers on Wednesday, he said.

Romania keeps ancient tradition of bee medicine alive

Bee venom to combat multiple sclerosis, pollen for indigestion, honey to heal wounds -- the humble bee has been a key source of alternative medicines since ancient times, and Romania is working to keep the tradition of "apitherapy" alive. The tradition goes back to ancient Greece when Hippocrates applied honey to treat wounds, and the Romans saw pollen as "life-giving". In the past of India, China and Egypt, a resinous substance collected by bees from the buds of certain trees, known as "propolis", was popular as an antiseptic.

EU study finds honey bees death rates are lower than feared

By Barbara Lewis BRUSSELS (Reuters) - A pioneering European Union survey into the impact of pests and diseases on honey bees found death rates were lower than feared, in part countering concerns about the collapse of colonies of the crop-pollinating insects. The study of 32,000 bee colonies across 17 EU member states from late 2012 until summer 2013 found winter mortality rates ranged from 3.5 percent to 33.6 percent.

Health Canada pushed to force pesticide makers to release bee-death studies

OTTAWA - Four major environmental groups are demanding that Ottawa force pesticide makers to provide scientific studies looking at whether their products are killing off bees. Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency has been asking registered pesticide manufacturers for the studies since 2004. But despite several notices, the studies haven't been produced, while the pesticides in question continue to be manufactured and sold. Beekeepers, meanwhile, are growing ever more alarmed as their bees continue to die off.

USDA to spend $3M to help honeybees by improving pastures in Upper Midwest

MILWAUKEE - The U.S. Department of Agriculture will spend millions of dollars to help farmers and ranchers improve pastures in five Midwestern states to provide food for the nation's struggling honeybees under a program to be announced Tuesday. Commercial honeybees pollinate an estimated $15 billion worth of produce each year. Many beekeepers bring hives to the Upper Midwest in the summer for bees to gather nectar and pollen for food, then truck them in the spring to California and other states to pollinate everything from almonds to apples to avocadoes.

Sensors to be attached to bees to study their decline in Australia

Sydney, Jan 15 (EFE).- Australian scientists will attach tiny sensors on some 5,000 honey bees to study their behavior and gain an understanding of the causes of the ongoing decline in their population, ABC Online reported Wednesday. The project undertaken by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization and the University of Tasmania is designed to help improve honey production and requires that part of the bees' bodies be shaved so that the sensors can be glued on, a procedure which doesn't harm the bee or impede its mobility.

Sensors to be attached to bees to study their decline in Australia

Sydney, Jan 15 (EFE).- Australian scientists will attach tiny sensors on some 5,000 honey bees to study their behavior and gain an understanding of the causes of the ongoing decline in their population, ABC Online reported Wednesday. The project undertaken by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization and the University of Tasmania is designed to help improve honey production and requires that part of the bees' bodies be shaved so that the sensors can be glued on, a procedure which doesn't harm the bee or impede its mobility.

Australian scientists microchip bees to map movements, halt diseases

By Thuy Ong SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australian scientists are gluing tiny sensors onto thousands of honey bees to track their movements in a trial aimed at halting the spread of diseases that have wiped out populations in the northern hemisphere.

Wanted: Billions of bees for European farms

Many countries in Europe face a worrying lack of crop-pollinating honeybees, a problem caused mainly by an EU policy shift in favour of biofuels, scientists warned on Wednesday. "Europe as a whole only has two-thirds of the honeybee colonies it needs, with a deficit of more than 13.4 million colonies -- equivalent to around seven billion bees," they said. Researchers at the University of Reading in southern England compared the number of beehives in 41 European countries with pollination demand from 2005 to 2010.
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