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Thai PM given more time in critical legal case

Thailand's Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave crisis-mired Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra more time to submit her defence against allegations of abuse of power which could see her removed from office. The premier, who is facing a cascade of legal challenges to her tenure as well as months of sometimes violent street protests, must give her defence by May 2, the court said in a statement. The case pivots on the transfer of then-national security chief Thawil Pliensri after Yingluck was elected in 2011.

Thai PM given more time in critical legal case

Thailand's Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave crisis-mired Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra more time to submit her defence against allegations of abuse of power which could see her removed from office. The premier, who is facing a cascade of legal challenges to her tenure as well as months of sometimes violent street protests, must give her defence by May 2, the court said in a statement. The case pivots on the transfer of then-national security chief Thawil Pliensri after Yingluck was elected in 2011.

Thai court gives PM time to defend herself; economy rudderless

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre and Aukkarapon Niyomyat BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thailand's Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra until early May to defend herself against charges of abuse of power, as the central bank warned that the political crisis threatened another cut in its growth forecast.

Thai PM given more time in crucial legal case

Thailand's Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra more time to submit her defence against allegations of abuse of power which could see her removed from office. The premier, who has faced a series of legal challenges to her tenure as well as months of sometimes violent anti-government street protests, must give her defence by May 2, the court said in a statement. The case pivots on the transfer of then-national security chief Thawil Pliensri after Yingluck was elected in 2011.

Fresh Thai election no closer despite multi-party meeting

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thailand's political impasse looked no closer to a solution on Tuesday despite a rare meeting of political parties and the Election Commission to discuss how and when a new vote should be held after a general election in February was declared void. About 58 parties including the ruling Puea Thai Party met in Bangkok to discuss a rerun, after months of anti-government protests that have crippled Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's caretaker government and the economy.

Opposition no-show hinders Thai election talks

Negotiations on a roadmap to elections in Thailand following months of political turmoil suffered a major setback Tuesday as the opposition pulled out of rare multi-party talks at the last minute. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is pushing for new polls as soon as possible to bolster her precarious position in the face of a series of legal threats that could force her from office. The kingdom has been without a fully functioning government or parliament since December, and a general election held in February was voided after opposition demonstrators disrupted voting.

Opposition no-show hinders Thai election talks

Negotiations on a roadmap to elections in Thailand following months of political turmoil suffered a major setback Tuesday as the opposition pulled out of rare multi-party talks at the last minute. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is pushing for new polls as soon as possible to bolster her precarious position in the face of a series of legal threats that could force her from office. The kingdom has been without a fully functioning government or parliament since December, and a general election held in February was voided after opposition demonstrators disrupted voting.

Thailand's fractious parties to discuss new elections

Thailand's quarrelling political parties are to meet Tuesday to discuss a roadmap to fresh elections following months of deadly street protests aimed at toppling Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra. The kingdom has been without a fully functioning government or parliament since December, and an election held in February was declared invalid after opposition demonstrators disrupted voting. The Southeast Asian nation has been shaken by months of political violence that has left 25 people dead and hundreds wounded, including many protesters, in grenade attacks and shootings.

Opposition no-show hinders Thai election talks

Talks between Thailand's quarrelling political parties on a roadmap to elections following months of deadly political turmoil ended with no breakthrough Tuesday after the opposition pulled out at the last minute. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is pushing for new polls as soon as possible to bolster her precarious position in the face of a series of legal threats that could force her from office.

Clock ticking for Thai PM as court verdict nears

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre BANGKOK (Reuters) - A Thai court will decide this week whether to give embattled Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra more time to defend herself against charges of abuse of power, accusations that could bring her down, or whether to move swiftly to a verdict. The fate of Yingluck and her government will determine the course of politics in Thailand which is polarized between the supporters of her and her brother, ousted former premier Thaksin Shinawatra, and supporters of the royalist establishment.
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