Connect to share and comment

Thai election agency says turnout in Senate election under 50%

Thailand's Election Commission announced Monday barely more than 40 percent of 48.7 million eligible voters turned out to vote for the Senate on Sunday. EC Deputy Secretary General Somsak Suriyamongkol told a press conference the low turnout was related to the ongoing political turmoil even though there was no disruption from protesters during the voting. The turnout was 42.78 percent and the percentage of voters who did not want to vote for anyone was 11.96.

Thai premier appears at anti-graft agency to defend rice policy

Thai caretaker Prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra appeared before the National Anti-Corruption Commission on Monday to explain her government's rice-subsidy policy. She went to the agency Monday afternoon after discussing the matter with legal advisers who had earlier submitted documents on the policy to the commission. She left the office after 30 minutes but offered no comment on what was discussed.

Thai PM defends herself against negligence charges

Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra testified Monday in front of anti-graft officials over negligence charges that could lead to her removal from office and a ban from politics. Yingluck arrived at the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) in Bangkok on Monday but made no comment to the media as she entered the building or as she left ten minutes later, an AFP reporter said. She was summoned to answer charges linked to a controversial rice subsidy scheme, which paid farmers above market rates for their crops.

Thai PM set to give defence against negligence charges

Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is expected Monday to mount her defence against negligence charges linked to a controversial rice subsidy scheme that could presage her removal from office and a ban from politics. Yingluck has been summoned to appear before the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) by Monday after a bid to push back the deadline for her defence was rejected. She could face an impeachment vote in the upper house of parliament within weeks.

Thailand's 'red shirts' gear up for a fight

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre and Aubrey Belford KHON KAEN/BANGKOK (Reuters) - The clock is ticking for Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who faces impeachment within weeks, but her supporters are hatching plans to thwart any move to dismiss her, with some leaders assembling what amount to militias. Yingluck has until later on Monday to defend herself before the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) against charges of dereliction of duty over a ruinously expensive rice-buying scheme.

Thais vote for Senate as PM showdown looms

Thais voted Sunday to elect the upper house of parliament in a poll that could hold the key to the fate of the prime minister, who faces possible impeachment for negligence after months of street protests. While the Senate is officially non-partisan, in reality the two main political camps are vying for control of the chamber in the absence of a functioning lower house following incomplete February polls.

Thais vote for Senate ahead of crucial deadline for PM

By Amy Sawitta Lefevre BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thais voted on Sunday for half of the country's 150-seat Senate in a key test for Yingluck Shinawatra's troubled government, a day before the prime minister is due to defend herself against negligence charges over a disastrous rice subsidy scheme. Anti-government protesters are in their fifth month of a campaign to force Yingluck out and set in motion political and electoral reforms before a new general election takes place.

Thailand goes to polls for election of upper house

Thai voters went to the polls Sunday to elect a new Senate, the non-partisan upper chamber of the National Assembly. Unlike the contentious general election for the lower house held Feb. 2, balloting was held smoothly and there was no disruption from the opposition, Election Commission Secretary General Puchong Nutrawong said. Polling stations opened 8 a.m. and will close at 3 p.m. Senators serve for a fixed six-year term.

Thailand goes to polls for election of upper house

Thai voters went to the polls Sunday to elect a new Senate, the non-partisan upper chamber of the National Assembly. Unlike the contentious general election for the lower house held Feb. 2, balloting was held smoothly and there was no disruption from the opposition, Election Commission Secretary General Puchong Nutrawong said. Polling stations opened 8 a.m. and will close at 3 p.m. Senators serve for a fixed six-year term.

Protest-plagued Thailand holds Senate elections

Polls opened in Thailand Sunday to elect the upper house of parliament in a vote that could hold the key to the fate of the prime minister, who faces possible impeachment for negligence after months of street protests. While the Senate is officially non-partisan, in reality the two main political camps are vying for control of the chamber in the absence of a functioning lower house following incomplete February polls.
Syndicate content