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Myanmar frees scores of child soldiers from armed forces

Myanmar's army has freed 96 children and young people from its armed forces, the United Nations said Saturday, hailing a "historic step" towards ending the use of child soldiers in the formerly junta-run nation. The move was the largest single release of child recruits since Myanmar's new reformist government and its "tatmadaw" army signed a June 2012 pact with the UN on the issue. A total of 272 children and young people have been released over the past 18 months as the military has slowed -- but not yet completely halted -- its use of children.

LDP's Komura to visit Myanmar next week

Liberal Democratic Party Vice President Masahiko Komura will make a five-day visit to Myanmar from Sunday and meet opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Monday, the ruling party said Friday. Komura will discuss with Suu Kyi Japan's support for legislative improvement toward democratization in the Southeast Asian country. The LDP is also arranging a meeting between Komura and President Thein Sein.

LDP's Komura to visit Myanmar next week

Liberal Democratic Party Vice President Masahiko Komura will make a five-day visit to Myanmar from Sunday and meet opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Monday, the ruling party said Friday. Komura will discuss with Suu Kyi Japan's support for legislative improvement toward democratization in the Southeast Asian country. The LDP is also arranging a meeting between Komura and President Thein Sein.

Japan to give 10 bil. yen to aid Myanmar's ethnic minorities

Japan plans to provide 10 billion yen chiefly in grants over the next five years to Myanmar to bolster the living standards of ethnic minorities that have suffered during years of internal conflicts in the country, government sources said Saturday. Tokyo intends to provide the aid to help accelerate ongoing peace talks between the government of President Thein Sein and ethnic rebels, the sources said.

Japan to give 10 bil. yen to aid Myanmar's ethnic minorities

Japan plans to provide 10 billion yen chiefly in grants over the next five years to Myanmar to bolster the living standards of ethnic minorities that have suffered during years of internal conflicts in the country, government sources said Saturday. Tokyo intends to provide the aid to help accelerate ongoing peace talks between the government of President Thein Sein and ethnic rebels, the sources said.

Suu Kyi urges Myanmar army to back charter reform

Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Saturday called on the powerful military to get involved in reforming the country's junta-era constitution, which currently bars her from becoming president. The Nobel laureate, who has repeatedly asserted her readiness to take on the top political job, said the nation's "tatmadaw" army was "essential" in amending the charter, which is currently being debated by a parliamentary panel that includes soldiers.

Suu Kyi urges Myanmar army to back charter reform

Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Saturday called on the powerful military to get involved in reforming the country's junta-era constitution, which currently bars her from becoming president. The Nobel laureate, who has repeatedly asserted her readiness to take on the top political job, said the nation's "tatmadaw" army was "essential" in amending the charter, which is currently being debated by a parliamentary panel that includes soldiers.

Myanmar president calls for cautious approach to charter change

Myanmar President Thein Sein voiced concern Thursday over the constitutional amendment sought by the main opposition party led by Aung San Suu Kyi, warning it could end up in "a political impasse" if the stakeholders fail to make the right decisions. In his monthly public radio address, Thein Sein said, "I believe that a healthy Constitution must be amended from time to time" to address national, economic, and social needs.

Myanmar president supports changing army-drafted constitution

By Aung Hla Tun YANGON (Reuters) - Myanmar's president gave his backing on Thursday for amending a military drafted constitution and indicated support for changes that would make Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi eligible to lead the country. Thein Sein, the reformist general and former top member of the army regime that ruled Myanmar for 49 years, said changing the constitution could help national reconciliation and he did not support laws that bar anyone from becoming president.

Myanmar president backs constitutional amendment

Myanmar's leader on Thursday lent his support to reform of the country's junta-era constitution, indicating he would back changes to allow opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi to become president. Thein Sein, a former general who has won international praise for dramatic reforms since he became president in 2011, said lively debate about revising the charter showed increasing "political maturity".
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