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Suu Kyi urges Myanmar army to back charter reform

Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Saturday called on the powerful military to get involved in reforming the country's junta-era constitution, which currently bars her from becoming president. The Nobel laureate, who has repeatedly asserted her readiness to take on the top political job, said the nation's "tatmadaw" army was "essential" in amending the charter, which is currently being debated by a parliamentary panel that includes soldiers.

Suu Kyi urges Myanmar army to back charter reform

Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Saturday called on the powerful military to get involved in reforming the country's junta-era constitution, which currently bars her from becoming president. The Nobel laureate, who has repeatedly asserted her readiness to take on the top political job, said the nation's "tatmadaw" army was "essential" in amending the charter, which is currently being debated by a parliamentary panel that includes soldiers.

Myanmar president calls for cautious approach to charter change

Myanmar President Thein Sein voiced concern Thursday over the constitutional amendment sought by the main opposition party led by Aung San Suu Kyi, warning it could end up in "a political impasse" if the stakeholders fail to make the right decisions. In his monthly public radio address, Thein Sein said, "I believe that a healthy Constitution must be amended from time to time" to address national, economic, and social needs.

Myanmar president supports changing army-drafted constitution

By Aung Hla Tun YANGON (Reuters) - Myanmar's president gave his backing on Thursday for amending a military drafted constitution and indicated support for changes that would make Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi eligible to lead the country. Thein Sein, the reformist general and former top member of the army regime that ruled Myanmar for 49 years, said changing the constitution could help national reconciliation and he did not support laws that bar anyone from becoming president.

Myanmar president backs constitutional amendment

Myanmar's leader on Thursday lent his support to reform of the country's junta-era constitution, indicating he would back changes to allow opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi to become president. Thein Sein, a former general who has won international praise for dramatic reforms since he became president in 2011, said lively debate about revising the charter showed increasing "political maturity".

8 released from Myanmar prisons after presidential amnesty

Myanmar on Tuesday freed eight political prisoners a day after President Thein Sein announced an amnesty for all remaining people imprisoned for political offenses. Bo Kyi, a member of the government's Political Prisoners Scrutinizing Committee, confirmed to Kyodo News that five prisoners were released from Insein Prison in Yangon, two from Taunggyi Prison in Shan State and one from Mawlamyine Prison in Mon state.

Myanmar declares 'no more political prisoners' after amnesty

Myanmar on Tuesday declared it would have "no more political prisoners" by year-end after announcing a sweeping amnesty, releasing several inmates as campaigners voiced concern that more dissidents remain behind bars. The country, which had pledged to free all prisoners of conscience by the end of 2013, has held a series of high-profile amnesties as part of dramatic reforms since the end of outright military rule nearly three years ago.

Myanmar declares 'no more political prisoners' after amnesty

Myanmar on Tuesday announced there were "no more political prisoners" after issuing a sweeping amnesty order aimed at fulfilling a presidential pledge to free all dissidents by the end of the year. The country has released scores of prisoners of conscience as part of dramatic reforms, implemented since the end of outright military rule in 2011, that have ended the former pariah's international isolation and seen most western sanctions disbanded.

Myanmar declares 'no more political prisoners' after amnesty

Myanmar on Tuesday announced there were "no more political prisoners" after issuing a sweeping amnesty order aimed at fulfilling a presidential pledge to free all dissidents by the end of the year. The country has released scores of prisoners of conscience as part of dramatic reforms, implemented since the end of outright military rule in 2011, that have ended the former pariah's international isolation and seen most western sanctions disbanded.

Myanmar to free most political detainees in year-end amnesty

YANGON (Reuters) - Myanmar is expect to release most of its prisoners of conscience on Tuesday and scores more awaiting trial, activists said, after the government announced a year-end amnesty for those held for political reasons. State-run MRTV announced the presidential amnesty in a bulletin late on Monday but did not reveal the number due for release, but an organization that tracks political detainees and assists the government said it expected 230 to be freed and the rest in mid-January.
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