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'Bionic man' makes debut at Washington's Air and Space Museum

By Lacey Johnson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A first-ever walking, talking "bionic man" built entirely out of synthetic body parts made his Washington debut on Thursday. The robot with a human face unveiled at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum was built by London's Shadow Robot Co to showcase medical breakthroughs in bionic body parts and artificial organs. "This is not a gimmick. This is a real science development," museum director John Dailey said.

'Bionic man' walks, breathes with artificial organs, limbs

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Gentlemen, we can rebuild him, after all. We have the technology. The term "bionic man" was the stuff of science fiction in the 1970s, when a popular TV show called "The Six Million Dollar Man" chronicled the adventures of Steve Austin, a former astronaut whose body was rebuilt using artificial parts after he nearly died. Now, a team of engineers has assembled a robot using artificial organs, limbs and other body parts that comes tantalizingly close to a true "bionic man." For real, this time.

Alice Munro, dubbed Canada's 'Chekhov'

Canadian novelist -- and now Nobel prize winner -- Alice Munro sets her taut, acutely observed stories in the rural Ontario countryside where she grew up, focusing a stark lens on the frailties of the human condition. Despite her vast success and an impressive list of literary prizes awarded over the past four decades, Munro, 82, remains as unassuming and modest as the characters in her collections of short stories and novels.

Canadian authors ecstatic over Munro's Nobel Prize win: 'She truly is our Chekhov'

TORONTO - Canadian writers and literary experts reacted with ecstatic pride to Thursday's announcement that cherished homegrown short story master Alice Munro had won the Nobel Prize in literature, saying it was long-overdue and richly deserved. "She's so perfect. I'm thrilled," said author Joan Barfoot from London, Ont., in southwestern Ontario, where Munro grew up. "I've read every word she's ever written and just thought, 'This is perfection.'" "I think my first thought was 'Finally,'" said Toronto-based writer Wayson Choy.

Alice Munro, dubbed Canada's 'Chekhov'

Canadian novelist -- and now Nobel prize winner -- Alice Munro sets her taut, acutely observed stories in the rural Ontario countryside where she grew up, focusing a stark lens on the frailties of the human condition. The Swedish Nobel Academy honored Munro with its literature prize on Thursday, hailing her as a "master of the contemporary short story," and praising her "finely tuned storytelling, which is characterized by clarity and psychological realism. Some critics consider her a Canadian Chekhov."

'Northampton Clown' terrifies British town

A mysterious clown dressed like the malevolent character from the Stephen King novel "It" has been scaring residents with random appearances in the British town of Northampton. The "Northampton Clown", whose identity remains unknown, said on Friday that the bizarre behaviour involving posting pictures of himself around the town was "harmless fun." The clown, who wears a white mask with red hair like the character Pennywise in King's 1986 book and holds balloons, has attracted a following of 147,000 people on Facebook.

John Grisham's 'Time to Kill' adapted for Broadway stage

By Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - Best-selling author John Grisham's first novel, "A Time to Kill," has been adapted for the stage and is heading for Broadway next month with an ensemble cast that includes Fred Dalton Thompson of TV's "Law and Order" and Tom Skerritt, an Emmy-award winner for "Picket Fences." Although many of Grisham's nearly two dozen novels have been turned into popular films, "A Time to Kill," is the first to be adapted for the stage. The play will open on October 20.

J.K. Rowling announces Harry Potter spin-off movie series

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling is to make her screenwriting debut by penning a series of spin-off films set in the magical world of the British boy wizard, she announced on Thursday, putting her in line for another huge payday. The first film will be called "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and will be based on a textbook of the same name used by Harry and his classmates at their school Hogwarts, Rowling said on her Facebook page.

J.K. Rowling announces Harry Potter spin-off movie series

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling is writing a series of spin-off films set in the magical world of the British boy wizard, she announced on Thursday. The first film will be called "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and will be based on a textbook of the same name used by Harry and his classmates at their school Hogwarts, Rowling said on her Facebook page.

Did ‘Sons of Anarchy' earn that school shooting scene?

By Tim Molloy NEW YORK (TheWrap.com) - "Sons of Anarchy" delivered its take Tuesday on one of the most horrible crimes of our time, the school shooting. It seemed to come out of nowhere. The Season 6 premiere provided occasional glimpses into the life of a boy in a private school uniform. We see his mother asleep, out cold. At one point he catches the interest of SAMCRO's leader, Jax. And then he walks into a school building and starts shooting. We don't see the shooting, only see flashes and hear screams.
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