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US Holocaust survivor meets Polish savior 70 years on

A Jewish boy who hid from the Nazis in a hayloft reunited after 70 years in New York on Wednesday with the Polish son whose parents risked everything to save him. Beaming American Holocaust survivor Leon Gersten, 79, embraced and clasped the hand of a visibly moved Czeslaw Polziec, 81, whose Polish parents saved five Jews during World War II. Gersten welcomed Polziec after his exhausting trans-Atlantic flight before a battery of cameras at New York's JFK airport, supported by his children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Results trickle in after Mauritania election

Results from polling stations across Mauritania began to trickle in Sunday but the electoral commission said it wasn't in a position to give an early picture of nationwide trends. The commission said counting had been delayed in many regions where people were allowed to cast their ballots after the official deadline, adding that definitive results from Saturday's election would be made available "perhaps in the middle of the week".

Islamists poised to enter parliament as Mauritania goes to polls

By Laurent Prieur NOUAKCHOTT (Reuters) - Voters in Mauritania went to the polls in Saturday in legislative and local elections expected to bring a once-outlawed Islamist party into parliament for the first time. The legislative polls - the first since a 2008 army putsch - are being boycotted by most of the West African nation's opposition parties.

Mauritania stages peaceful election despite opposition boycott

Mauritanians voted Saturday in nationwide elections overshadowed by a widespread boycott of opposition parties, with all eyes on the performance of an Islamist party allowed to take part for the first time. The mainly-Muslim republic, a former French colony on the west coast of the Sahara desert, is seen as strategically important in the fight against Al-Qaeda-linked groups within its own borders, as well as in neighbouring Mali and across Africa's Sahel region.

Islamists poised to enter parliament as Mauritania goes to polls

By Laurent Prieur NOUAKCHOTT (Reuters) - Voters in Mauritania went to the polls in Saturday in legislative and local elections expected to bring a once-outlawed Islamist party into parliament for the first time. The legislative polls - the first since a 2008 army putsch - are being boycotted by most of the West African nation's opposition parties.

Mauritania holds elections despite opposition boycott

Mauritanians voted Saturday in nationwide elections overshadowed by a widespread boycott of opposition parties, with all eyes on the performance of an Islamist party allowed to take part for the first time. The mainly-Muslim republic, a former French colony on the west coast of the Sahara desert, is seen by the West as strategically important in the fight against Al-Qaeda-linked groups within its own borders, as well in neighbouring Mali and across Africa's Sahel region.

Sink or swim for Mauritania's Islamists

Mauritania's main Islamist party has emerged during an otherwise unremarkable election campaign as an unknown quantity which observers believe will be greatly strengthened by Saturday's polls -- or killed off completely. The former French colony's ruling Union for the Republic (UPR) is widely expected to retain power, but opinion is divided over whether Islamist party Tewassoul, only legalised in 2007, will give the favourites a bloody nose.

Mauritanian parties accuse rivals of foul play

Mauritania's ruling party and Islamist opposition group traded accusations of foul play on Tuesday as the campaign for the west African nation's legislative and local polls drew towards its conclusion. The governing Union for the Republic (UPR) -- overwhelming favourites to win Saturday's elections -- cast doubts over the funding of Tewassoul, a relatively new party fighting its first election.

Mauritania police beat protesters urging poll boycott

Mauritanian police on Monday crushed a protest by hundreds of youths demanding a boycott of upcoming elections, wounding several. An AFP reporter saw police beat the activists and spray them with tear gas as they waved placards and chanted slogans outside the offices of the election commission in the capital Nouakchott, calling for a boycott of Saturday's parliamentary and local elections.

US military ready to train Libyan troops

The US military said Monday it hopes to train 5,000 to 8,000 Libyan army troops as Tripoli struggles to contain violence from heavily armed militias. The training, requested by Libya's prime minister, would be carried out by the military's Africa Command at a base in Bulgaria, Pentagon spokesman Colonel Steve Warren told reporters. "We're in discussions with the Libyans on the exact number, but we're prepared to provide training for 5,000 to 8,000 personnel," Warren said. "This hasn't been finalized yet, but that's the plan we're working towards," he said.
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