Connect to share and comment

EU agency backs new drugs from J&J, Lilly, Takeda

LONDON (Reuters) - European regulators said on Friday they had recommended approval of new pills for hepatitis C and diabetes from Johnson & Johnson and Eli Lilly, respectively, and an injectable drug for ulcerative colitis from Takeda. Recommendations for marketing approval by the European Medicine Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) are normally endorsed by the European Commission within a couple of months. (Reporting by Ben Hirschler; editing by Keith Weir)

Furiex irritable bowel syndrome drug succeeds in large trials

By Bill Berkrot (Reuters) - Shares of Furiex Pharmaceuticals Inc more than doubled in value after the company said its experimental drug significantly alleviated diarrhea and abdominal pain associated with irritable bowel syndrome in two large late-stage trials. Furiex said it would apply by mid-year for U.S. approval of the drug, eluxadoline, to treat diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-d), a debilitating bowel disorder that affects about 28 million people in the United States and major European markets.

Medigus launches device to treat acid reflux without surgery

By Tova Cohen TEL AVIV (Reuters) - Israeli medical device maker Medigus expects revenue of a few million dollars in 2014 as it begins to sell its flexible endoscope for the treatment of acid reflux. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is caused by abnormal regurgitation of fluids from the stomach into the esophagus. Patients who do not respond to treatment with drugs often undergo laparoscopic surgery.

Given Imaging wins US approval for pill camera in patients who have trouble with colonoscopy

WASHINGTON - A kinder, gentler approach to one of the most dreaded exams in medicine is on the way: U.S. regulators have cleared a bite-size camera to help screen patients who have trouble with colonoscopies. The ingestible pill camera from Given Imaging is designed to help doctors spot polyps and other early signs of colon cancer. The Food and Drug Administration cleared the device for patients who have had trouble with the cringe-inducing colonoscopy procedure, which involves probing the large intestine with a tiny camera embedded in a four-foot long, flexible tube.

Given Imaging wins US approval for pill camera in patients who have trouble with colonoscopy

WASHINGTON - A kinder, gentler approach to one of the most dreaded exams in medicine is on the way: U.S. regulators have cleared a bite-size camera to help screen the large intestine of patients who have trouble with colonoscopies. The ingestible pill camera from Given Imaging is designed to help doctors spot polyps and other early signs of colon cancer. The Food and Drug Administration cleared the device for patients who have had trouble with the cringe-inducing procedure, which involves probing the colon using a tiny camera on a four-foot long, flexible tube.

Diverticulosis complications may be relatively rare

By Shereen Jegtvig NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Diverticulosis, a common condition that causes small pouches in the walls of the intestines, might not be as dangerous as doctors have thought. The pouches are usually harmless. But sometimes they become inflamed and infected, in a painful condition known as diverticulitis. Experts have thought that about one in four patients with diverticulosis would eventually develop diverticulitis. But a new study suggests the actual risk may be much lower.

New treatment could help those with Crohn's, colitis

A new treatment could offer relief to those with the inflammatory bowel conditions Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to findings published Wednesday in the United States. Vedolizumab, an intravenous antibody medication, offers new hope for the approximately four million people who suffer from the auto-immune diseases, say researchers who led two clinical trials, the results of which were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Exalenz launches new breath test to detect H. pylori bacteria

TEL AVIV (Reuters) - Exalenz Bioscience, a developer of diagnostic systems that use a patient's breath to detect gastrointestinal and liver conditions, launched BreathID Hp, a next generation device in the company's BreathID product line. U.S.-Israeli Exalenz said on Monday BreathID Hp offers a specific, non-invasive test for H. pylori.

Experts tell flatulent flyers: let rip

A group of medical specialists has provided an answer to a dilemma that has faced flyers since the Wright brothers took to the air in 1903 -- is it okay to fart mid-flight? The experts' recommendation is an emphatic yes to airline passengers -- but a warning to cockpit crews that breaking wind could distract the pilot and pose a safety risk. The study concluded that anecdotal evidence that flying increases flatulence is not hot air, finding that changes in air pressure at altitude result in the gut producing more gas.

Experts tell flatulent flyers: let rip

A group of medical specialists has provided an answer to a dilemma that has faced flyers since the Wright brothers took to the air in 1903 -- is it okay to fart mid-flight? The experts' recommendation is an emphatic yes to airline passengers -- but a warning to cockpit crews that breaking wind could distract the pilot and pose a safety risk. The study concluded that anecdotal evidence that flying increases flatulence is not hot air, finding that changes in air pressure at altitude result in the gut producing more gas.
Syndicate content