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Malaysia PM to visit Perth as jet-search window narrows

Malaysia Prime Minister Najib Razak will visit Australia to witness the race-against-time bid to locate a crash site for flight MH370, his government said Monday as a ship equipped to pinpoint its "black box" prepared to steam to the search area. Ships and planes from seven nations scanned a vast zone far off western Australia for yet another day, but the hunt for debris that would prove the Malaysia Airlines jet crashed in the Indian Ocean more than three weeks ago turned up nothing.

Australia says no time limit on hunt for Malaysian jet

Australian premier Tony Abbott said Monday there was no time limit on the search for MH370 and that the world deserved to know what happened, as a ship equipped to locate the "black box" prepared to set sail. The hunt for physical evidence that the Malaysia Airlines jet carrying 239 people crashed in the Indian Ocean more than three weeks ago has so far proved fruitless despite a massive operation involving seven countries. Hopes raised by sightings of debris have repeatedly been crushed as the objects turned out to be random sea junk such as fishing gear.

Chinese families in Malaysia demand answers over MH370 tragedy

Dozens of relatives of Chinese passengers on a missing Malaysia Airlines flight arrived Sunday in Kuala Lumpur to demand answers about the plane's fate, with some calling for an apology from Malaysia's government. Thirty-nine family members of 18 passengers arrived seeking answers, said the airline's commercial director Hugh Dunleavy. At a hotel on the outskirts of the capital, relatives wearing white T-shirts reading "Pray for MH370" displayed banners reading: "Tell us the truth. Give us our relatives back."

Chinese families in Malaysia demand answers over MH370 tragedy

Almost 30 relatives of Chinese passengers on a missing Malaysia Airlines flight arrived Sunday in Kuala Lumpur to demand answers about the plane's fate, with some calling for an apology from Malaysia's government. Twenty-nine family members arrived, according to an official of the Malaysian Chinese Association, a party in the ruling coalition which is providing support for them. An airline official had earlier put the figure at 39.

More Chinese families arrive in Malaysia over MH370 tragedy

About 50 Chinese relatives of passengers on board missing flight MH370 arrived in Malaysia on Sunday to press for answers about the fate of their loved ones. The grieving families, who have accused Malaysia of hiding information over the fate of the Boeing 777, are calling for a meeting with Prime Minister Najib Razak and his transport minister Hishammuddin Hussein, The Star online said. Najib's aide said no meeting with the newly arrived families had been scheduled for Sunday.

Missing jet drama boosts veteran Malaysian politician

Malaysia's missing plane has made Hishammuddin Hussein a globally recognised lightning rod for foreign criticism of his country's handling of the crisis, but could end up catapulting him to prime minister someday. Hishammuddin, 52, has become a household name thanks to his daily press briefings on the crisis, broadcast live to rapt audiences around the world.

MH370 search looks for debris breakthrough in new area

Ship and plane crews Saturday searched a vast new area of the Indian Ocean for wreckage from a Malaysian plane which went missing three weeks ago, seeking closure for relatives and clues to the crash. China, which lost 153 people when the Boeing 777 went down on March 8 with a total of 239 on board, was at the forefront of the sweep across a vast expanse of sea about the size of Norway.

'Under siege' Malaysia hits back at China over MH370

Malaysians are chafing at scathing Chinese criticism over the lost MH370 passenger jet, with fed-up officials, media and citizens now hitting back after being assailed as a nation of incompetent liars and murderers. Authorities in Kuala Lumpur have been on the defensive since the Beijing-bound Malaysia Airlines flight went missing on March 8 with 239 people aboard, most of them Chinese citizens.

'Under siege' Malaysians hit back at China over MH370

Malaysians are chafing at scathing Chinese criticism over the lost MH370 passenger jet, with fed-up officials, media and citizens now hitting back after being assailed as incompetent liars and murderers. Authorities in Kuala Lumpur have been on the defensive since the Beijing-bound Malaysia Airlines flight went missing on March 8 with 239 people aboard, most of them Chinese citizens.

'History will judge us well' on MH370

Malaysia's government said on Wednesday that it would be judged favourably by posterity over its much-questioned handling of the crisis over missing flight MH370. "I think history will judge us well," Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein told a daily press briefing on the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight. Hishammuddin had been asked how Malaysia would be able to repair its image and "bruising" treatment by the international media. "'Bruising,' I think is a bit too harsh because this is unprecedented," he said.
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