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Malaysia's jet crash announcement draws criticism

Malaysia drew criticism at home and abroad on Tuesday for announcing that a missing passenger jet with 239 people aboard had been lost at sea, even before any wreckage was found. The country's flag carrier also received ire for informing some relatives of the plane's loss by text message, although it insisted this had been a "last resort". A sombre Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday that Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which vanished more than two weeks ago, had "ended in the southern Indian Ocean".

Missing MH370 came down in Indian Ocean

The missing Malaysia Airlines jet came down in the Indian Ocean, Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday, as the airline reportedly told relatives it had been lost and that none on board survived. "It is therefore with deep sadness and regret that I must inform you that, according to this new data, flight MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean," Najib told a press conference, citing new satellite information. dma/sls

Malaysia PM to give press briefing on missing plane at 1400 GMT - media

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak will hold a press conference at 10.00 pm (1400 GMT) on new developments on the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, the Star newspaper said on Monday citing a government official. No other details were given. (Reporting by Niluksi Koswanage; Editing by Nick Macfie)

Searchers spot objects that may be from missing Malaysia Airlines jet

Kuala Lumpur, Mar 24 (EFE).- An Australian search plane spotted two objects Monday in the Indian Ocean that may be from the Malaysia Airlines plane that disappeared earlier this month with 239 people aboard. "A few minutes ago, the prime minister (Najib Razak) received a call from the prime minister of Australia (Tony Abbott), who informed him that an Australian plane has spotted two objects, one circular and the other rectangular," Malaysian Defense Minister and acting Transportation Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said in a press conference.

Search expands in southern Indian Ocean in hunt for possible debris from missing Malaysian jet

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - More planes were joining the search Sunday of a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean in hopes of finding answers to the fate of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet, after China released a satellite image showing a large object floating in the search zone. The desolate area in the Indian Ocean is about 2,500 kilometres (1,550 miles) southwest of Perth, Australia, where three days of searching for similar images from another satellite that emerged earlier in the week have produced no results.

Malaysia says China has new images of floating objects

China has new satellite images of floating objects that could be related to missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, Malaysian Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said Saturday. "The news that I just received is that the Chinese ambassador received satellite image of floating objects in the southern corridor and they will be sending ships to verify," Hishammuddin told a news briefing in Kuala Lumpur. bjp-gh/mtp

Airliner crisis compounds Malaysian government's woes

Malaysia's missing-plane crisis has exposed the shortcomings of a ruling regime already wrestling with a rapidly shrinking support base, fierce racial divisions and international criticism of its tough handling of political opponents. The same government has ruled since Malaysia's birth in 1957, and political observers said its much-criticised response to the jet drama is symptomatic of years of institutional atrophy under an ethnic Malay elite known for cronyism.

Airliner crisis compounds Malaysian government's woes

Malaysia's missing-plane crisis has exposed the shortcomings of a ruling regime already wrestling with a rapidly shrinking support base, fierce racial divisions and international criticism of its tough handling of political opponents. The same government has ruled since Malaysia's birth in 1957, and political observers said its much-criticised response to the jet drama is symptomatic of years of institutional atrophy under an ethnic Malay elite known for cronyism.

New satellite image boosts Malaysia plane search hopes

China released Saturday a new satellite image of a large floating object possibly linked to missing Malaysian Flight MH370, boosting search efforts as anger with the pace of the operation boiled over among Chinese relatives in Beijing. The grainy photo taken on March 18 released by the State Administration of Science Technology and Industry showed an object measuring 22.5 metres by 13 metres (74 by 43 feet) in the southern Indian Ocean.

Australia searches ocean site for possible plane debris

Surveillance aircraft scoured a remote and stormy section of the Indian Ocean on Thursday for a pair of floating objects that Australia and Malaysia guardedly called a "credible" lead in the 12-day-old hunt for a missing passenger jet. Australia said the objects -- one was estimated at 24 metres (79 feet) across -- were captured in satellite imagery, raising hopes of a breakthrough in the Malaysian plane's mysterious disappearance as relatives of the 239 people aboard braced for another emotional roller-coaster.
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