Connect to share and comment

Protest-hit China city says no plant without public support

BEIJING (Reuters) - A city in southern China which has been the site of violent protests against a proposed chemical plant said it will not go ahead with the project if a majority of residents object to it, as authorities seek to head off more unrest. Photos posted on Weibo, China's Twitter-like microblog service, have showed hundreds of demonstrators marching along the streets over the past two days, an overturned car in flames and protesters laying bloodied on the road.

China factory index barely changed, HSBC gauge dips for 3rd month in latest slowdown signs

HONG KONG - An official measure of Chinese factory activity barely budged last month while a private survey found manufacturing deteriorated in the first quarter, adding to signs the world's No. 2 economy is slowing. The purchasing managers' index by the China Federation of Logistics Economists said the increase should have been a lot stronger because factories typically return to full speed in March after shutting for the extended Lunar New Year holiday, which begins in either January or February each year.

S. China village holds democratic election for third year in a row

Thousands of voters cast their votes Monday in Wukan village in southern China's Guangdong Province for third year after China allowed a test of democratic election for the village committee following an uprising in 2011 that ousted allegedly corrupted then party leaders.

Rebel China village holds new elections under a cloud

Rain-drenched voters in a Chinese village which rebelled against Communist officials and held landmark democratic elections returned to the polls Monday in a ballot clouded by signs authorities are reasserting their power. Wukan, in south China's Guangdong province, grabbed headlines worldwide in 2011 when locals staged huge protests and drove out Communist Party officials they accused of illegal land grabs and the death of a detained local villager.

Rebel China village holds new elections under a cloud

Rain-drenched voters in a Chinese village which rebelled against Communist officials and held landmark democratic elections returned to the polls Monday in a ballot clouded by signs authorities are reasserting their power. Wukan, in south China's Guangdong province, grabbed headlines worldwide in 2011 when locals staged huge protests and drove out Communist Party officials they accused of illegal land grabs and the death of a detained local villager.

China rebel village votes, but hopes fade for fair poll

By Maxim Duncan WUKAN, China (Reuters) - Villagers in southern Guangdong who launched an open revolt against local authorities in 2011 held an election on Monday amid intensifying pressure against protest leaders, who have either been detained or sought asylum abroad. The government pressure is casting doubt on China's ability to establish grassroots democracy and underscores the limits of China's village elections, over which local governments often assert control.

Rebel China village set for new elections

A Chinese village which held landmark democratic elections after it rebelled against Communist Party officials heads to the polls again on Monday, shadowed by fears that local authorities are reasserting their grip on power. The village of Wukan, in south China's Guangdong province, grabbed headlines worldwide in 2011 when locals staged huge protests and drove out Communist Party officials they accused of illegal land grabs. Protest leaders were swept to power in landmark elections months later.

Taiwan President Ma blinks, agrees to protesters' demands

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou agreed Saturday to two of the demands made by opponents of a controversial China trade deal, one day before a mass rally called by the protesters. Twelve days after protesters shut down the legislative branch and stormed the government headquarters, Ma agreed to the demands of demonstrators, numbering around 200 and made up mostly of university students, that the agreement on trade in services signed in June last year be reviewed and voted on clause-by-clause.

Taiwan President Ma blinks, agrees to protesters' demands

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou agreed Saturday to two of the demands made by opponents of a controversial China trade deal, one day before a mass rally called by the protesters. Twelve days after protesters shut down the legislative branch and stormed the government headquarters, Ma agreed to the demands of demonstrators, numbering around 200 and made up mostly of university students, that the agreement on trade in services signed in June last year be reviewed and voted on clause-by-clause.

China's Xi talks culture in France but business prevails

After a day devoted to multi-billion-dollar business deals, Chinese leader Xi Jinping trained his sights on culture and history Thursday on the last day of his lavish visit to France. Yet business was still the talk of the day at an economic forum on the margins of the three-day state visit, as French Finance Minister Pierre Moscovici called for more Chinese investment in France in a bid to boost jobs and growth.
Syndicate content