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Target acknowledges it didn't take immediate action on cyber breach alert

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Target Corp. is acknowledging its security software picked up on suspicious activity after a massive cyberattack was launched, but it decided not to take immediate action. The acknowledgement comes after a media report said Thursday that Target's security team in Bangalore received security alerts on Nov. 30 that indicated malicious software had appeared in its network. It then flagged the security team at its home office in Minneapolis.

Ukraine's computers targeted by powerful virus

Dozens of computer networks in Ukraine have been infected by an aggressive new cyber weapon called Snake, according to expert analysis. The cyber weapon has been increasingly used since the start of this year, even before protests that led to the overthrow of president Viktor Yanukovych, British-based BAE Systems said in a report published Friday. The complex composition of Snake bears similarities with Stuxnet, the malware that disrupted Iran's nuclear facilities in 2010.

Ukraine's computers targeted by powerful virus

Dozens of computer networks in Ukraine have been infected by an aggressive new cyber weapon called Snake, according to expert analysis. The cyber weapon has been increasingly used since the start of this year, even before protests that led to the overthrow of president Viktor Yanukovych, British-based BAE Systems said in a report published Friday. The complex composition of Snake bears similarities with Stuxnet, the malware that disrupted Iran's nuclear facilities in 2010.

Suspected Russian spyware Turla targets Europe, United States

By Peter Apps and Jim Finkle LONDON/BOSTON (Reuters) - A sophisticated piece of spyware has been quietly infecting hundreds of government computers across Europe and the United States in one of the most complex cyber espionage programs uncovered to date. Several security researchers and Western intelligence officers say they believe the malware, widely known as Turla, is the work of the Russian government and linked to the same software used to launch a massive breach on the U.S. military uncovered in 2008.

Target executive's departure in wake of data breach puts spotlight on CIOs, need for security

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Hackers are putting top technology executives under severe pressure. And this week's sudden departure of Target's chief information officer in the wake of the company's massive pre-Christmas data breach has only ratcheted up the stress. Years ago, the job of a CIO focused mainly on the upkeep of computer systems. In their largely behind-the-scenes roles, most of their major decisions centred on the kinds of technological innovations a company would adopt, when and how much to pay for systems upgrades and the creation and maintenance of company websites.

US businessman sold trade secrets to China

A US jury convicted a California businessman Wednesday of selling stolen trade secrets to Chinese firms so they could develop a pigment used to whiten a wide range of products. US officials said the conviction of Walter Lian-Heen Liew, also known as Liu Yuanxuan, marked the first federal jury conviction on charges brought under the Economic Espionage Act of 1996.

US businessman, engineer sold trade secrets to China

A US jury convicted a California businessman Wednesday of selling stolen trade secrets to Chinese firms so they could develop a pigment used to whiten a wide range of products. US officials said the conviction of Walter Lian-Heen Liew (also known as Liu Yuanxuan) marked the first federal jury conviction on charges brought under the Economic Espionage Act of 1996.

U.S. says businessman convicted in DuPont economic espionage case

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. jury on Wednesday convicted a California businessman accused of stealing DuPont trade secrets to help a state-owned Chinese company develop a white pigment used in a wide range of products, a U.S. government spokesman said. In a San Francisco federal court, jurors found Walter Liew guilty on multiple counts including conspiracy to commit economic espionage, a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Justice said.

SEC's Aguilar sees cyber-threat risk to 'transfer agents'

By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission should consider updating its rules to protect against technology failures or cyber attacks of "transfer agent" firms charged with maintaining millions of shareholder accounts, SEC Democratic Commissioner Luis Aguilar said Friday. Transfer agents are critical gatekeepers in U.S. markets, though they do not often receive much public attention.

S. Korea pushes to develop offensive cyberwarfare tools

By Kim Eun-jung SEOUL, Feb. 19 (Yonhap) -- South Korea will push to develop sophisticated cyberwarfare tools that could wreak havoc on North Korea's nuclear facilities as part of its plans to beef up offensive capabilities, the defense ministry said Wednesday. The ministry reported a long-term plan for cyberpolicy to the parliamentary defense committee, at a time when calls have risen to reform the Cyber Warfare Command, which has been dogged by allegations of an online smear campaign in the 2012 presidential election.
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