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U.S. eyes sea trials of gear that may destroy Syria chemical arms

By Missy Ryan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States will conduct a sea test this month of equipment that could be used to neutralize Syria's most deadly chemical weapons at sea, U.S. defense officials said on Thursday. Two large chemical neutralization units, which employ a process known as hydrolysis to render toxic chemicals safe enough to be disposed of at commercial sites, are being installed below deck on the Cape Ray, a U.S. Merchant Marine ship.

(Recast) Interview: Public dialogue, civil society involvement vital to disarm CWs, Right Livelihood Award Laureate

by Xinhua Writer Fu Yiming STOCKHOLM, Dec. 2 (Xinhua) -- Public dialogue and civil society involvement are vitally important to the process of chemical weapons disarmament, says Paul Walker, recipient of the 2013 Right Livelihood Award, on Monday.

Interview: Public dialogue, civil society involvement essential to eliminate chemical weapons

by Xinhua Writer Fu Yiming STOCKHOLM, Dec. 2 (Xinhua) -- Public dialogue and civil society involvement are vitally important to the process of chemical weapons disarmament, says Paul Walker, recipient of the 2013 Right Livelihood Award, on Monday.

Dozens of firms interested in destroying Syrian chemicals: OPCW sources

By Anthony Deutsch AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - More than two dozen companies have expressed interest in destroying Syria's chemical weapons stockpile, sources at the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), told Reuters on Friday. The global chemical weapons watchdog is seeking commercial firms to destroy toxins from Syria's poison gas arsenal, and is trying to find a Mediterranean port where the deadliest can be processed offshore after Albania abruptly backed out of its offer to have it done on its territory.

US offers to destroy deadliest portion of Syria's chemical arms at sea

WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is offering to destroy some of Syria's deadliest chemical weapons in international waters aboard a nearly 700-foot (213-meter), U.S. government-owned ship, U.S. officials told The Associated Press. The plan, still subject to final approval, would involve destroying the weapons, likely aboard the MV Cape Ray in the Mediterranean Sea, with U.S. Navy warships patrolling nearby. This approach would avoid the vexing diplomatic, environmental and security problems posed by disposing of the materials on any nation's soil.

AP sources: US considering using special ship to destroy Syria's chemical weapons at sea

WASHINGTON - Destroying Syria's deadliest chemical weapons on land would come with vexing diplomatic and security problems as well as environmental issues. To avoid those potential troubles, U.S. officials say, the Obama administration is exploring the use of a government-owned ship to carry out the disposal in international waters.

Tokyo High Court rejects poison gas damages claim by 2 Chinese

The Tokyo High Court on Tuesday rejected a damages suit filed by two Chinese against the Japanese government over their injuries caused by a Japanese poison gas shell, upholding a district court ruling last year. The plaintiffs will take the suit against the Japanese government to the Supreme Court. The two Chinese were injured when they touched liquid from the shell in a river in Dunhua, Jilin Province, in July 2004, while the Japanese government was collecting Japanese poison gas weapons left in China since World War II.

Syria chemical weapons could be destroyed at sea

Syria's over 1,000 tonnes of chemical weapons and precursors could be destroyed at sea if no country agrees to dispose of them on its soil, the world's chemical watchdog said Wednesday. "This possibility has been looked at for some time already," Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) spokesman Christian Chartier told AFP of destroying the chemicals at sea. "It's still being looked at and is one of several solutions envisaged by member states and as long as a decision has not been taken, it remains a possibility," Chartier said.

Exclusive: Syria's chemical weapons may be destroyed at sea - sources

By Anthony Deutsch and Michelle Nichols AMSTERDAM/UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Syria's chemical weapons could be processed and destroyed out at sea, say sources familiar with discussions at the international body in charge of eliminating the toxic arsenal.

Japan ready to send 3 more defense personnel as inspectors in Syria

The Japanese government said Tuesday it is prepared to supply three additional defense force members to an international chemical weapons watchdog as inspectors, following calls for cooperation in the mission to eliminate a stockpile of chemical weapons from Syria. In conjunction with the personnel dispatch, the government plans to help finance the dismantlement efforts, according to government officials.
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