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Large aluminum smelter in Montenegro is declared bankrupt by a court

PODGORICA, Montenegro - A large aluminum smelter that once was the pride of Montenegro has been declared bankrupt. The Commercial Court issued its ruling Wednesday about Kombinat Aluminijuma Podgorica, or KAP, a company that has been losing money for years. The court said KAP's property will be offered for sale free of debt in the next 20 days. The smelter's debt officially stands at euros 360 million, or about 9 per cent of Montenegro's GDP, not counting legal claims pending against it.

Hungary win men's water polo world title

BARCELONA, Spain (Reuters) - Hungary edged Montenegro 8-7 in the men's water polo final to win gold at the world aquatic championships on Saturday. It was the third world title for the Hungarians to add to their 12 European and nine Olympic gold medals as the tournament's dark horses produced an enthralling final on a warm evening in Barcelona.

Montenegro opposition demands new presidential vote

More than 5,000 opposition supporters protested in the Montenegrin capital Saturday against alleged fraud in an April 7 presidential election, demanding a new poll be called. The opposition candidate in the presidential vote, Miodrag Lekic, the only challenger to the declared winner, incumbent President Filip Vujanovic, has cried foul over alleged vote-rigging. Both candidates had claimed victory in the election for the largely ceremonial post. But the electoral commission eventually ruled that Vujanovic won 51.21 percent of votes, while Lekic got support of 48.79 percent.

Montenegro opposition to protest against president's re-election

PODGORICA (Reuters) - Montenegro's opposition has called supporters into the streets to protest against President Filip Vujanovic's re-election and said it will take allegations of electoral fraud to the courts. Although the post is largely ceremonial, the fact that the vote was extremely close has rattled Vujanovic's Democratic Party of Socialists (DPS), who have held power for more than two decades, and given the opposition Democratic Front momentum.

Montenegrin president wins third term, opposition cries foul

By Petar Komnenic PODGORICA (Reuters) - Montenegrin President Filip Vujanovic claimed a third term on Monday in the largely ceremonial post, but opposition allegations of election fraud could trigger instability in the tiny Adriatic republic seeking European Union membership. Election authorities declared Vujanovic winner of a Sunday election, but the narrow margin of victory marked a blow for the ruling Democratic Party of Socialists (DPS) after more than two decades in power.

OSCE urges Montenegro to let commission rule on poll result

Europe's top security grouping OSCE on Monday urged Montenegro's two presidential candidates, both of whom have claimed victory in polls at the weekend, to leave the tiny Adriatic country's electoral commission to determine the results. "The maturity of a country is also demonstrated by the way in which close races are dealt with by the contestants and the responsible state institutions," the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe's Parliamentary Assembly said in a statement.

Montenegro election to bring country closer to EU

Montenegrins voted Sunday in a presidential election tipped to give incumbent Filip Vujanovic a third mandate that would cement the ruling coalition's grip on power in the economically struggling EU hopeful. Vujanovic's sole challenger is former foreign minister Miodrag Lekic, who has managed to get the Balkan state's main opposition groups to overcome their bickering and back his candidacy. Polls closed at 1800 GMT, with voter turnout estimated at over 50 percent. No major irregularities were reported during the vote, officials said.

Montenegro presidential election to bring it closer to EU

Montenegrins voted Sunday in a presidential election tipped to give incumbent Filip Vujanovic a third mandate that would cement the ruling coalition's grip on power in the economically struggling EU hopeful. Vujanovic's sole challenger is former foreign minister Miodrag Lekic, who has managed to get the Balkan state's main opposition groups to overcome their bickering and back his candidacy. The election of the new president, a largely ceremonial role in Montenegro, is the country's second since proclaiming independence from Serbia, its decades-long partner, in 2006.

Montenegro votes for president to bring it closer to EU

Montenegrins voted Sunday in a presidential election tipped to give incumbent Filip Vujanovic a third mandate that would cement the ruling coalition's grip on power in the economically struggling EU hopeful. His sole challenger is former foreign minister Miodrag Lekic, who has managed to get the Balkan state's main opposition groups to overcome their bickering and back his candidacy. The vote for president, a largely ceremonial role in Montenegro, is the country's second since proclaiming independence from Serbia, its decades-long partner, in 2006.

Facts about Montenegro

Facts about Montenegro which voted on Sunday to choose a new president who will lead the EU-candidate Balkan country for a five-year term. GEOGRAPHY: Montenegro shares borders with Serbia, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia, Kosovo and Albania and has an Adriatic coastline less than 300 kilometres long. LAND MASS: 13,812 square kilometres (5,333 square miles) POPULATION: About 632,000, some 45 percent Montenegrins, 29 percent Serbs, 9 percent Bosnian Muslims and 5 percent Albanians. CAPITAL: Podgorica LANGUAGE: Montenegrin
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