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Canada police nab young man in Heartbleed data theft

Federal police said Wednesday they have arrested and charged a 19-year-old man in the theft of 900 Canadian taxpayers' data, which was made vulnerable by the "Heartbleed" bug. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) said Stephen Arthuro Solis-Reyes was arrested at his London, Ontario home on Tuesday without incident. He is scheduled to appear in court on Thursday to face charges of mischief and unauthorized use of a computer to steal data from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)'s website.

Heartbleed bug shutters more Canadian gov't websites

Canada's government on Friday ordered all federal department websites vulnerable to the "Heartbleed" bug to be shut down. "The chief information officer for the government of Canada issued a directive to all federal government departments to immediately disable public websites that are running unpatched OpenSSL software," Treasury Board President Tony Clement said a statement. "This action is being taken as a precautionary measure until the appropriate security patches are in place and tested."

'Heartbleed' bug puts encrypted data in danger

Trust in the Internet took a major blow on Tuesday as alarm spread that software commonly used to encrypt and secure online transactions could wind up giving away the store. Computer security specialists, website masters, and fans of online privacy were worriedly abuzz with word of a freshly-discovered flaw in online data-scrambling software that hackers can turn to their advantage.

'Heartbleed' bug puts encrypted data in danger

Computer security specialists on Tuesday raised alarm about a freshly discovered bug in online data-scrambling software that hackers can turn to their advantage. The bug dubbed "Heartbleed" in OpenSSL encryption software lets attackers illicitly retrieve passwords and other bits of information from working memory on computer servers, according to cyber-defense specialists at Fox-IT. OpenSSL is used to protect passwords, credit card numbers and other data coursing through the Internet.

'Heartbleed' bug puts encrypted data in danger

Computer security specialists on Tuesday raised alarm about a freshly discovered bug in online data-scrambling software that hackers can turn to their advantage. The bug dubbed "Heartbleed" in OpenSSL encryption software lets attackers illicitly retrieve passwords and other bits of information from working memory on computer servers, according to cyber-defense specialists at Fox-IT. OpenSSL is used to protect passwords, credit card numbers and other data coursing through the Internet.

Trove of Adobe user data found on Web after breach: security firm

By Jim Finkle (Reuters) - A computer security firm has uncovered data it says belongs to some 152 million Adobe Systems Inc user accounts, suggesting that a breach reported a month ago is far bigger than Adobe has so far disclosed and is one of the largest on record. LastPass, a password security firm, said on Thursday that it has found email addresses, encrypted passwords and password hints stored in clear text from Adobe user accounts on an underground website frequented by cyber criminals.

FACTBOX-What are cyberlockers?

AUCKLAND, Jan 19 (Reuters) - Cyberlockers, are also known as cloud storage or file storage services, enable users to keep files, or back them up, on the internet. Users can access files from these virtual storage lockers, which operate on remote servers, from any computer with an internet connection, often more quickly than on personal computers. Many of these sites offer limited free storage, and users can pay for more capacity through subscriptions. WHAT ARE THEY USED FOR?
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