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Lebanon to vote on president without clear favourite

Lebanon's parliament convenes Wednesday to try to elect a new president without a clear frontrunner in sight because of deep divisions over the Syrian conflict and Hezbollah's arsenal. The conflict next door in Syria has pushed more than one million refugees into Lebanon and drawn in the powerful Hezbollah which is fighting alongside the Syrian regime. The violence has also spilled over into Lebanon, which was dominated by Syria for nearly three decades, in the form of car bombs and armed clashes.

Arab Israeli journalist arrested after Lebanon visit

An Arab Israeli journalist has been arrested after making a visit to Lebanon, his mother said Thursday, on suspicion he could have joined a "hostile organisation". Majd Kayyal, 23, from the northern coastal city of Haifa, crossed into Jordan on March 23 and travelled on to Lebanon for a conference organised by As-Safir newspaper, Israel's Shin Bet domestic security agency said. A Shin Bet spokeswoman stressed Lebanon is defined as "an enemy country" and Israelis are prohibited from visiting.

Hezbollah TV says 3 staffers killed in Syria's Maalula

Lebanon's Hezbollah television channel Al-Manar announced that three staffers were killed while covering the Syrian army's takeover Monday of the Christian town of Maalula. "Al-Manar expresses its condolences for our three martyred colleagues -- correspondent Hamza al-Hajj Hassan and technician Halim Allaw, as well as cameraman Mohammad Mantash, killed by bullets from armed groups in Maalula," a presenter said. ser/al

Hezbollah shifts tactics, narrative for Syria fight

Lebanon's Hezbollah movement is gaining new combat experience in Syria, shedding its guerrilla tactics to fight alongside an army, and shifting its narrative to explain the battle against "Sunni extremists". Its forces, who used their homeground advantage and methods such as underground tunnels against Israel's army in Lebanon, are now the targets of unconventional warfare on unfamiliar terrain in Syria.

Warily, Lebanon tackles violent spillover from Syria

By Alexander Dziadosz TRIPOLI, Lebanon (Reuters) - For two weeks now, the rifles have been silent along Syria Street in Lebanon's Tripoli, an area shot up so often that even memorial posters of men killed just a few months ago are speckled with bullet holes. Soldiers patrol quiet streets where gunmen used to fight day and night - part of the Lebanese authorities' most serious effort yet to contain spillover from Syria's civil war since the three-year-old conflict began in its much larger neighbor.

Hezbollah fighters say a 'duty' to help Syria's Assad

As he pushes a cart full of tomatoes and cucumbers in the market at Bint Jbeil in southern Lebanon, nothing marks out Mahmud as an experienced Hezbollah fighter. The stocky vegetable vendor in his fifties, who sports a red beard, fought Israel here in 2006, but that battle is now old news. He has just come back from another front: in Syria, where he fought for 25 days against the rebels who have sought to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad for the past three years.

Germany outlaws 'Hezbollah fundraising group'

German authorities banned a group Tuesday accused of raising millions for the Lebanese militant organisation Hezbollah and staged raids across the country against its members. The interior ministry said it had outlawed the "Waisenkinderprojekt Libanon" (Orphan Children Project Lebanon) with immediate effect. "The name of the group masks its actual purpose," ministry state secretary Emily Haber said in a statement.

Bulgaria says bomber in Burgas attack was Algerian: report

SOFIA (Reuters) - The man who blew up a bus in a Bulgarian Black Sea resort in 2012, killing five Israeli tourists, was of Algerian origin and trained in camps in South Lebanon, the Bulgarian daily Presa said, quoting sources familiar with the investigation. Sofia has said Lebanese militant group Hezbollah was behind the attack at the Burgas airport. The European Union last July put the group's armed wing of the group on its terrorism blacklist over the incident. Hezbollah denies any involvement.

Nasrallah says Hezbollah targeted Israel patrol

Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah said in an interview published Monday that his Lebanese Shiite group was behind a blast that targeted Israeli troops on the border between the two countries last month. "Yes, the explosion in the Shebaa Farms that Hezbollah has not claimed until now was the work of the resistance, which means the work of Hezbollah," Nasrallah told the Al-Safir daily. The March 14 explosion came after Israeli warplanes carried out air strikes inside Lebanon that were believed to have targeted its positions near Lebanon's border with Syria.

Nasrallah says Hezbollah targeted Israel patrol

Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah said in an interview published on Monday that his Lebanese Shiite group was behind a blast that targeted Israeli troops on the border between the two countries last month. "Yes, the explosion in the Shebaa Farms that Hezbollah has not claimed until now was the work of the resistance, which means the work of Hezbollah," Nasrallah told the Al-Safir daily. The blast, on March 14, came after Israeli warplanes carried out air strikes inside Lebanon that were believed to have targeted its positions near Lebanon's border with Syria.
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