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Obama's Prague agenda is for youth to inherit

Since President Obama made his momentous Prague speech five years ago calling for a world without nuclear weapons, people in Hiroshima and Nagasaki continue to request that the president visit their cities. While many feel that Obama's Prague agenda has lost momentum in the face of the harsh realities of both international security and domestic politics, it is fair to say that significant progress has been made on both the nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation fronts.

India's Modi says committed to no first use of nuclear weapons

NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India prime ministerial frontrunner Narendra Modi said he was committed to a policy of no first use of nuclear weapons, seeking to assuage concern after his Hindu nationalist BJP party vowed to revise the nuclear doctrine if elected to power. India declared itself a nuclear weapons state after carrying out tests in the summer of 1998, which were followed by tests by Pakistan. Since then both have been developing nuclear weapons and testing longer range missiles.

Nuclear export group debates ties with Israel: document

By Fredrik Dahl VIENNA (Reuters) - The United States and three European allies want a global body controlling nuclear exports to consider whether to establish closer ties with non-members including Israel, despite its assumed atomic arsenal, a confidential document showed. The issue is sensitive as Israel is outside a 1970 international pact designed to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and the Jewish state is widely believed to be the only country with such arms in the volatile Middle East.

Non-nuclear armed states urge world leaders to visit A-bombed cities

Foreign ministers from a coalition of non-nuclear weapons states on Saturday urged world leaders to visit and learn from the two Japanese cities atom-bombed in 1945, as they reiterated their commitment to a world free of nuclear arms. The ministers of the 12-member Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Initiative also expressed concern about the reported build-up of nuclear arsenals by some nations, an apparent reference to countries such as China and India, and condemned North Korea's nuclear weapons program.

Foreign ministers discuss nuclear disarmament in Hiroshima

Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida pledged his country's efforts toward nuclear nonproliferation and disarmament Saturday at a meeting of non-nuclear weapon countries in the city of Hiroshima. At the ministerial meeting, the 12-member Nonproliferation and Disarmament Initiative is expected to call on nuclear powers to scale back their arsenals and for world leaders to visit Hiroshima and Nagasaki, two Japanese cities devastated by U.S. atomic bombings in World War II.

U.S. No. 2 diplomat Burns to retire this fall

Deputy U.S. Secretary of State William Burns, a veteran career diplomat known for his work dealing with Iran's nuclear programs, will retire in October, the U.S. State Department said Friday. President Barack Obama said in a separate statement, "Since I took office, I have relied on him for candid advice and sensitive diplomatic missions." In his statement accepting Burns' resignation, Secretary of State John Kerry praised Burns as "a diplomat's diplomat with this terrifically rare mix of strategic vision and operations skill."

Foreign ministers start nuclear disarmament talks in Hiroshima

Foreign ministers from a group of countries without nuclear weapons gathered Friday in Hiroshima for a two-day event to discuss nuclear arms reduction. Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and his Dutch counterpart Frans Timmermans and Australian counterpart Julie Bishop participated in discussions with students, representatives from nongovernmental organizations and local government leaders to start the event.

Kishida eyes urging heads of nuclear powers to visit A-bombed cities

Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said Monday he hopes to call at a ministerial meeting on nuclear disarmament starting Friday for the leaders of nuclear weapons states to visit the two Japanese cities hit by U.S. atomic bombing during World War II. "Having leaders of countries visit the atomic-bombed cities and see the reality (of nuclear weapons use) would be a very meaningful step toward building momentum for efforts to create a world without nuclear weapons," Kishida said in an interview with Kyodo News.

N. Korea scores poorly on disarmament efforts in Hiroshima report

North Korea scored poorly on efforts to reduce nuclear arms or promote nonproliferation in a new report issued Monday by the Hiroshima prefectural government, which graded 31 nations. The "Hiroshima Report" said North Korea, which conducted its third nuclear test in February last year, scored minus points in the categories of nuclear arms reduction and nuclear security and zero in the field of nonproliferation.

N. Korea scores poorly on disarmament efforts in Hiroshima report

North Korea scored poorly on efforts to reduce nuclear arms or promote nonproliferation in a new report issued Monday by the Hiroshima prefectural government, which graded 31 nations. The "Hiroshima Report" said North Korea, which conducted its third nuclear test in February last year, scored minus points in the categories of nuclear arms reduction and nuclear security and zero in the field of nonproliferation.
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