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Canadian eavesdropping agency fretted about staff safety following U.S. leaks

OTTAWA - Canada's secret eavesdropping agency feared for the personal safety of staff following the leak of sensitive intelligence by a former U.S. spy contractor, newly declassified memos show. The Ottawa-based Communications Security Establishment combed through personnel files to assess risks to employees whose name, agency affiliation or specific duties may have been disclosed by Edward Snowden, says an internal note from the head of the spy service.

Canadian eavesdropping agency fretted about staff safety following U.S. leaks

OTTAWA - Canada's secret eavesdropping agency feared for the personal safety of staff following the leak of sensitive intelligence by a former U.S. spy contractor, newly declassified memos show. The Ottawa-based Communications Security Establishment combed through personnel files to assess risks to employees whose name, agency affiliation or specific duties may have been disclosed by Edward Snowden, says an internal note from the head of the spy service.

Court wont' take early challenge to NSA phone surveillance, cases must go through lower courts

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Monday declined an early look at a constitutional challenge to the National Security Agency's bulk collection of millions of Americans' telephone records, instead allowing the dispute to work its way through the usual lower-court process. The decision means the high court will not take the unusual step of short-circuiting appeals courts as they consider contrary opinions over the legitimacy of the agency's vast surveillance program.

Supreme Court declines early look at case challenging government phone surveillance

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has declined an early look at a constitutional challenge to the National Security Agency's bulk collection of millions of Americans' telephone records. Conservative lawyer Larry Klayman persuaded a federal judge in December to rule that the agency's activities likely violate the Constitution's ban on unreasonable searches. The justices on Monday rejected Klayman's unusual request to bypass the traditional appeals process and hear the case immediately.

New law eyed ahead of 2020 Games to freeze assets tied to terrorists

The government is considering new legislation aimed at freezing the assets of people deemed terrorists to strengthen antiterrorism measures ahead of the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics in Tokyo, a government source said Saturday. The legislation, which may be submitted to a new parliamentary session in the fall, is likely to draw criticism for allowing the government to label people as terrorists at its discretion, and to infringe property rights guaranteed by the Constitution.

Obama's NSA overhaul may require phone carriers to store more data

By Mark Hosenball and Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama's plan for overhauling the National Security Agency's phone surveillance program could force carriers to collect and store customer data that they are not now legally obliged to keep, according to U.S. officials. One complication arises from the popularity of flat-rate or unlimited calling plans, which are used by the vast majority of Americans.

Boston Marathon bomb response exposed 'fault lines' in policing: study

By Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - The massive manhunt for the perpetrators of last year's Boston Marathon bomb attack exposed some "fault lines" in coordinating law enforcement at the federal, state and local levels, according to a study released on Thursday. Emergency responders racing to a crime scene without waiting for orders might save lives by tending to the wounded, but during the chaotic chase to catch the suspects a few days later, they also risked being shot by police, the Harvard University report found.

N. Korean drones prompt Seoul to boost surveillance

By Kim Eun-jung SEOUL, April 2 (Yonhap) -- South Korea is seeking to improve its surveillance capabilities to deal with rising military threats, following the discovery of two drones that Seoul believes belong to Pyongyang near the border, military officials said Wednesday.

N. Korean drones prompt Seoul to boost surveillance

By Kim Eun-jung SEOUL, April 2 (Yonhap) -- South Korea is seeking to improve its surveillance capabilities to deal with rising military threats, following the discovery of two drones that Seoul believes belong to Pyongyang near the border, military officials said Wednesday.

Rights group raps 'pattern of police abuse' in Malaysia

Human Rights Watch urged Malaysia on Wednesday to set up an independent body to probe what it said was a "pattern of police abuse" leading to deaths in custody and unjustified shootings of suspects. The US-based group said in a 102-page report titled "No Answers, No Apologies" that a culture of "impunity" permeates the national police force, which is widely condemned in Malaysia as corrupt, brutal and incompetent.
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