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Coalition wants US to end bulk data sweep

More than 40 activist organizations and companies called Tuesday for an overhaul of US government surveillance authority that goes beyond President Barack Obama's proposal. The coalition said Obama's proposal to end bulk collection of telephone data by the National Security Agency is positive, but does not go far enough. Any reforms should "prohibit bulk collection for all types of data, not just phone records," the groups said in a letter to the White House and US lawmakers.

Disgraced China military officer sold 'hundreds' of posts: sources

By Benjamin Kang Lim and Ben Blanchard BEIJING (Reuters) - A disgraced senior Chinese army officer is accused of selling hundreds of military positions, raking in millions of dollars, sources with ties to the leadership or military told Reuters, in what is likely China's biggest military scandal in two decades. In a renewed campaign on graft, Chinese President Xi Jinping has vowed to go after both powerful "tigers" and lowly "flies", warning that the issue is so severe it threatens the ruling Communist Party's survival.

CIA misled public about interrogation techniques

The CIA misled the government and the public about parts of its interrogation program for years, the Washington Post said Tuesday, quoting a report by the Senate Intelligence Committee. Specifically, the US agency hid details about the severity of its methods, overstated the significance of plots and prisoners and took credit for critical pieces of intelligence that detainees had in fact provided before they were subjected to harsh techniques, the Post said, quoting officials who have seen the 6,300-page report.

Officer remains in stable condition after shooting at Brampton, Ont., courthouse

BRAMPTON, Ont. - A police officer who was shot at a Toronto-area courthouse remained in hospital in stable condition, alert and speaking with his family, police said Saturday. Const. Mike Klarenbeek, 53, was providing security at the Brampton courthouse Friday morning when a man walked in and opened fire. The officer, who served with the Peel Region police force west of Toronto, was wounded and his assailant was killed by police gunfire.

Police allege there was a flurry of calls about Rob Ford video

TORONTO - Toronto police have identified a one-day flurry of communications about the so-called Rob Ford crack video after news first broke as part of their investigation into the mayor, court documents show. Media reports about the existence of the video appearing to show Ford smoking crack cocaine were published late at night on May 16, 2013. The next day there were 50 separate communications about the video found in intercepts through a gang, weapons and drugs investigation known as Project Traveller and found through phone record production orders, police allege.

Hagel: Pentagon to triple cyber staff as America's use of cyberspace outpaces security for it

WASHINGTON - The Pentagon plans to more than triple its cybersecurity staff in the next few years to defend against Internet attacks that threaten national security, Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel said Friday. Hagel's comments at the National Security Agency headquarters in suburban Washington come as he prepares to vist China next week, where officials are likely to challenge him amid reports of aggressive U.S. cyber spying.

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a long-awaited plan Thursday to end the US government's bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over surveillance on millions of Americans. Responding to a global outcry over the National Security Agency's extensive eavesdropping programs, Obama's plan would require telephone companies to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, with government agencies allowed to access it with court approval.

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a long-awaited plan Thursday to end the US government's bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over surveillance on millions of Americans. The shake-up, which also follows a global outcry over the National Security Agency's extensive eavesdropping programs, would require telephone companies to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, with government agencies only being allowed to access it with court approval.

White House unveils plan to end NSA's bulk collection of phone data

By Roberta Rampton and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration on Thursday announced details of its plan to end the government's vast bulk collection of data about phone calls made in the United States, including new procedures to get judicial approval before asking companies for such records. Under the plan, phone companies would have to provide data from their records quickly and in a usable format when requested by the government, a senior administration official told reporters on condition of anonymity.

UN panel urges US to rein in global snooping

Washington must shake up its overseas surveillance programme, shut Guantanamo, hold Americans accountable for "war on terror" violations and stem racism in the justice system, a UN panel said Thursday. In a wide-ranging report on the United States' respect for international rules, the UN Human Rights Committee faulted the current system of oversight for National Security Agency (NSA) snooping.
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