Connect to share and comment

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a long-awaited plan Thursday to end the US government's bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over surveillance on millions of Americans. Responding to a global outcry over the National Security Agency's extensive eavesdropping programs, Obama's plan would require telephone companies to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, with government agencies allowed to access it with court approval.

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a long-awaited plan Thursday to end the US government's bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over surveillance on millions of Americans. The shake-up, which also follows a global outcry over the National Security Agency's extensive eavesdropping programs, would require telephone companies to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, with government agencies only being allowed to access it with court approval.

White House unveils plan to end NSA's bulk collection of phone data

By Roberta Rampton and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration on Thursday announced details of its plan to end the government's vast bulk collection of data about phone calls made in the United States, including new procedures to get judicial approval before asking companies for such records. Under the plan, phone companies would have to provide data from their records quickly and in a usable format when requested by the government, a senior administration official told reporters on condition of anonymity.

UN panel urges US to rein in global snooping

Washington must shake up its overseas surveillance programme, shut Guantanamo, hold Americans accountable for "war on terror" violations and stem racism in the justice system, a UN panel said Thursday. In a wide-ranging report on the United States' respect for international rules, the UN Human Rights Committee faulted the current system of oversight for National Security Agency (NSA) snooping.

Obama says plan will end NSA bulk data sweep

President Barack Obama put forward a plan Thursday to end bulk collection of telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over the government's sweeping surveillance activities on millions of Americans. In measures taken in response to a global outcry over the National Security Agency's eavesdropping programs, Obama said telephone companies would be required to hold data for the same length of time they currently do, while allowing government agencies to access it with court approval.

Obama puts forward plan ending NSA bulk collection

President Barack Obama put forward his plan Thursday to end US government bulk collection of Americans' telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over mass surveillance. "I have decided that the best path forward is that the government should not collect or hold this data in bulk," Obama said, as he unveiled a formal proposal to reform procedures for the National Security Agency.

Obama says NSA to cease bulk data collection in US

President Barack Obama said Thursday the US government will end its bulk collection of Americans' telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over mass surveillance. "The best path forward is that the government should not collect or hold this data in bulk," Obama said, as he unveiled a formal proposal to reform procedures for the National Security Agency. ico-rl/dc

Brazil's anti-spy Internet bill clears lower house vote

By Anthony Boadle BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazil's lower chamber of Congress approved groundbreaking legislation on Tuesday aimed at guaranteeing equal access to the Internet and protecting the privacy of its users in the wake of U.S. spying revelations. To ensure passage of the bill, the government had to drop a contentious provision that would have forced global Internet companies to store data on Brazilian servers inside the country.

Brazil's anti-spy Internet bill clears lower house vote

By Anthony Boadle BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazil's lower chamber of Congress approved groundbreaking legislation on Tuesday aimed at guaranteeing equal access to the Internet and protecting the privacy of its users in the wake of U.S. spying revelations. To ensure passage of the bill, the government had to drop a contentious provision that would have forced global Internet companies to store data on Brazilian servers inside the country.

Obama says U.S. needs to win back trust after NSA spying

By Adrian Croft THE HAGUE (Reuters) - President Barack Obama said on Tuesday that U.S. intelligence agencies were not snooping on ordinary citizens but admitted it would take time to win back the trust of European governments and people after revelations of extensive U.S. surveillance. Former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden's disclosures about the sweep of the National Security Agency's monitoring activities triggered a national debate over privacy rights but also damaged relations with some European governments.
Syndicate content