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Cycling: Fit-again Froome ready for Contador challenge in Catalonia

Tour de France winner Chris Froome will race against Alberto Contador for the first time this season when the seven-stage Tour of Catalonia gets under way on Monday. Both men have been in fine early season form as Froome eased to victory in the Tour of Oman, whilst Contador won the Tirreno-Adriatico 'Race of the Two Seas' last week. Froome had been due to compete in Italy as well, but was forced to pull out due to a back problem. However, the Briton insists his absence was merely a precaution with bigger targets to come later in the year.

Cycling: French ire as Froome replaced by Porte in Tirreno-Adriatico

Britain's Tour de France winner Chris Froome has pulled out of next week's Tirreno-Adriatico week-long stage race in Italy with his Sky team replacing the Kenyan-born rider with Australian Richie Porte. But that move was met by anger from Paris-Nice organisers, Amaury Sports Organisation (ASO) as Porte had been due to begin the defence of his 'Race to the Sun' title on Sunday. Froome is suffering from a back complaint and hasn't raced since winning February's Tour of Oman.

Cycling: French ire as Froome replaced by Porte in Tirreno-Adriatico

Britain's Tour de France winner Chris Froome has pulled out of next week's Tirreno-Adriatico week-long stage race in Italy with his Sky team replacing the Kenyan-born rider with Australian Richie Porte. But that move was met by anger from Paris-Nice organisers, Amaury Sports Organisation (ASO) as Porte had been due to begin the defence of his 'Race to the Sun' title on Sunday. Froome is suffering from a back complaint and hasn't raced since winning February's Tour of Oman.

Cycling: Froome pulls out of Milan-San Remo

British reigning Tour de France champion Chris Froome said Monday he will not take part in next month's Milan-San Remo classic after plans to change the route fell through. "I thought I might try my luck because the organisers had decided to make the race more difficult by adding a climb in the final," Froome told reporters on the eve of the Tour of Oman, where he is also the defending champion. "But ultimately, the traditional, less difficult course will be used. It no longer makes sense to start in Milan."

Cycling: Froome welcomes tougher doping penalties

Tour de France champion Chris Froome has welcomed the introduction of tougher penalties for doping, and admitted that he had been personally "hit hard" by accusations he had cheated. Speaking at the end of a private visit to Kenya, the country of his birth and where he first fell in love with the sport, Froome said cycling was now a much cleaner sport than it was during the notorious Lance Armstrong era. "It is great that WADA plans to extend the ban from two to four years, and that cycling is being taken as leading the way in the fight in anti-doping," he told reporters.

Cycling: Confident Froome eyes Tour repeat

When the route for the 2014 Tour de France was revealed in Paris, it almost looked like the organisers had deliberately attempted to reduce reigning champion Chris Froome's chances. Kenyan-born Briton Froome was dominant in the 2013 edition of the greatest cycling race in the world, winning by more than four minutes from new young talent Nairo Quintana from Colombia. That hardly told the story of just how much Froome had controlled the race, winning three stages, two at the top of mountains and one in a time-trial.

Froome faces tough defense in treacherous 2014 Tour

By Julien Pretot PARIS (Reuters) - Britain's Chris Froome must successfully navigate a number of traps lurking around a tricky 2014 Tour de France route if he is to retain his title in cycling's most prestigious stage race. Starting in northern England on July 5, the Tour features stretches of cobbled roads in northern France, a treacherous crossing of the Vosges mountains and only one time trial - a favorite discipline of Team Sky leader Froome.

Strict testing means cycling cleanest sport, says Froome

By Pauline Mevel PARIS (Reuters) - Stringent drug testing means cycling is now probably the cleanest sport, Tour de France champion Chris Froome said on Monday. Froome is the first rider to win the Tour since American Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven titles for cheating and, perhaps unsurprisingly given cycling's drug-tainted past, the Briton found the finger of suspicion pointing at him during the race.

Cycling: Froome can restore cycling's reputation - father

Chris Froome's father claims the newly-crowned Tour de France champion is the perfect personality to restore cycling's battered reputation. Froome, 28, became Britain's second successive winner of the prestigious race when he crossed the finishing line in Paris on Sunday, following Bradley Wiggins' success 12 months earlier. But with the Lance Armstrong doping scandal still fresh in the minds of many, Froome has had to fend off some awkward questions throughout the Tour on the subject of drug cheats, particularly after his victory on stage 15 on top of Mont Ventoux.

Cycling: Kenya hails Froome, but regrets not their win

Kenya, birthplace of Tour de France winner Chris Froome, celebrated his victory on Monday but expressed regret he chose to fly a British and not Kenyan flag on the podium. "Why did we let him go? Now the glory goes to UK," wrote Allan Buluku in Kenya's Daily Nation newspaper. "But no matter, he has done Kenya proud. Congratulations Froome, we salute you." Froome, 28, became Britain's second successive winner of the prestigious race when he crossed the finishing line in Paris on Sunday, following Bradley Wiggins' success 12 months earlier.
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