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Kishida eyes urging heads of nuclear powers to visit A-bombed cities

Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said Monday he hopes to call at a ministerial meeting on nuclear disarmament starting Friday for the leaders of nuclear weapons states to visit the two Japanese cities hit by U.S. atomic bombing during World War II. "Having leaders of countries visit the atomic-bombed cities and see the reality (of nuclear weapons use) would be a very meaningful step toward building momentum for efforts to create a world without nuclear weapons," Kishida said in an interview with Kyodo News.

N. Korea 'will not rule out' a new nuclear test

North Korea said Sunday it "will not rule out" a new nuclear test as it defended its recent mid-range missile launch which triggered widespread international condemnation. "(We) will not rule out a new form of a nuclear test aimed at strengthening our nuclear deterrence," Pyongyang's foreign ministry said in a statement carried by the North's state-run KCNA news agency. The country's latest mid-range missile launch -- which followed a series of rocket and short-range missile tests in recent weeks -- was condemned by the United Nations Security Council on Friday.

Non-nuclear states to call for China to join U.S.-Russia arms talks

A draft joint statement for a foreign ministerial meeting in Hiroshima next month involving Japan and other non-nuclear weapons states will call for countries such as China to participate in the nuclear arms reduction talks between the United States and Russia, a Japanese government source said Sunday. The move is essentially aimed at China as the country is believed to be the only one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states under the global nonproliferation regime to be building up its nuclear warfare capabilities.

N. Korea threatens to boast 'nuclear deterrence'

SEOUL, March 14 (Yonhap) -- North Korea threatened on Friday to boast its "nuclear deterrence" if the United States continues to make "nuclear threats" against the communist nation, a possible warning of an additional nuclear test or long-range rocket launch. The so-called nuclear threats from the U.S. have long been the basis for North Korea's development of nuclear weapons.

Confab opens to discuss humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons

An international conference to discuss humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons opened Thursday in Mexico with atomic bomb survivors as well as representatives from more than 100 countries participating. Participants are expected to discuss a world without nuclear weapons as well as medium and long-term impact of atomic weapons on supply of food and climate change worldwide.

China conducts long-range nuclear missile drill

China's military has released immages of an intercontinental ballistic missile with enough range to reach the United States, as Beijing is involved in a series of rows threatening to embroil Washington. The pictures of Chinese soldiers test-firing a Dongfeng-31 missile, which is said by experts to be able to carry nuclear warheads 8,000 kilometres (4,960 miles), appeared in the People's Liberation Army Daily newspaper on Tuesday.

China conducts long-range nuclear missile drill

China's military has released images of an intercontinental ballistic missile with enough range to reach the United States, as Beijing is involved in a series of rows threatening to embroil Washington. The pictures of Chinese soldiers test-firing a Dongfeng-31 missile, which is said by experts to be able to carry nuclear warheads 8,000 kilometres (4,960 miles), appeared in the People's Liberation Army Daily newspaper on Tuesday.

U.S. nuclear weapon plans to cost $355 billion over a decade: CBO report

By David Alexander WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration's plans for the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, including modernization of bombs, delivery systems and laboratories, will cost the country about $355 billion over the next decade, the Congressional Budget Office said on Friday.

Nuclear war could put 2 billion at risk of starvation: study

A "limited" nuclear conflict where 100 "Hiroshima-sized" bombs were used would be enough to spark a global famine, threatening the food supply of two billion people, a report by an international organization warned Tuesday. "Even the very limited use of nuclear weapons would essentially be the detonation of a suicide bomb and people need to know that," International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War co-president Ira Helfand told Kyodo on Monday, the day before the report was released.

Japan welcomes U.N. statement on nuclear disarmament

Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida on Tuesday welcomed a statement issued at a U.N. committee by 125 countries including Japan and New Zealand that drew attention to the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons, calling it an expression of "political will."
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