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Nebraska court invalidates state's Keystone pipeline approval

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Nebraska court on Wednesday invalidated the governor's decision to allow the controversial Keystone XL pipeline to pass through the Midwestern state, casting uncertainty over the project to link Alberta's oil sands with refineries in Texas. Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman last year supported legislation that cleared the way for the $5.4 billion pipeline to cross parts of his state. But some landowners objected to the legislation, saying it sidestepped their rights.

US judge blocks Keystone pipeline route in Nebraska

The controversial Keystone XL pipeline met with another hurdle Wednesday when a Nebraska judge ruled that a state law granting approval to a proposed route was unconstitutional, court records showed. The decision came as US President Barack Obama was set to meet with Canadian Prime Minister at a trade summit in Mexico. Obama was expected to face a new entreaty from Harper to quickly make up his mind on the project, which would carry crude from Canada's oil sands across the continental United States to Texas.

Obama heads for less friendly 'three amigos' summit

President Barack Obama headed south Wednesday for a North American leaders summit, but may find slightly less chumminess than usual at "three amigos" talks between Canada, Mexico and the United States. Obama, who departed just before 8:45 am (1345 GMT) aboard Air Force One, will join President Enrique Pena Nieto and Prime Minister Stephen Harper at the ornate palace in Toluca, Mexico, for the daylong talks. The three nations, massive trading partners, are locked in several thorny disputes likely to surface in the talks and in a joint news conference later on.

Harper meets Keystone builder TransCanada ahead of Obama meeting in Mexico

MEXICO CITY - Prime Minister Stephen Harper is meeting leaders from the company that wants to build the Keystone XL pipeline just hours before he pushes U.S. President Barack Obama one more time to approve it. Harper's tete-a-tete with TransCanada officials comes this morning in Mexico City before he travels to the neighbouring city of Toluca for the so-called Three Amigos summit with Obama and Mexico's Enrique Pena Nieto.

White House to PM: You can try asking about KXL, don't expect much of an answer

WASHINGTON - The White House says Prime Minister Stephen Harper shouldn't expect any new information if he presses for details on Keystone XL at a leaders' summit next week. Senior officials in the Obama administration said at a media briefing on Friday that Harper will be told privately the same thing he's been hearing elsewhere in public comments from U.S. decision-makers about the proposed TransCanada pipeline. The message? There's a process underway in the U.S., the process is not politically directed, and it's not clear when it will end.

Time has come to look past Obama to reboot Canada-U.S. trade: Prentice

OTTAWA - It's high time Canada started looking beyond the Obama era if it wants to push economic integration with the United States to a new level, says former Conservative cabinet minister Jim Prentice. That includes pushing for approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, which has been stalled by the logjam of U.S. domestic politics — something that's unlikely to change in the next three years, Prentice said Wednesday.

Holding up Keystone won't slow increase in oil to U.S: Ambassador Gary Doer

EDMONTON - Canada's ambassador to the United States says stopping the Keystone XL pipeline won't stop an increasing amount of Alberta oil from getting to the Gulf Coast. Gary Doer says shipping oil by rail south of the border has skyrocketed in the last two years with a resulting increase in greenhouse gas emissions. He says that's why he will continue to work to persuade the U.S. government to approve the Keystone pipeline from Alberta to Texas. He says it helps that decision-makers in every U.S. state through which the line would run are pushing for its approval.

Holding up Keystone won't slow increase in oil to U.S: Ambassador Gary Doer

EDMONTON - Canada's ambassador to the United States says stopping the Keystone XL pipeline won't stop an increasing amount of Alberta oil from getting to the Gulf Coast. Gary Doer says shipping oil by rail south of the border has skyrocketed in the last two years with a resulting increase in greenhouse gas emissions. He says that's why he will continue to work to persuade the U.S. government to approve the Keystone pipeline from Alberta to Texas. He says it helps that decision-makers in every U.S. state through which the line would run are pushing for its approval.

Mulcair prefers cross-Canada oil pipeline, despite critical think-tank report

OTTAWA - Tom Mulcair is sticking by his assertion that piping oilsands bitumen across Canada is preferable to building the Keystone XL pipeline to the U.S. Gulf coast, despite a new report that contradicts his key assumptions. The notion of a west-east pipeline is the cornerstone of the NDP leader's energy policy. While he maintains Keystone is environmentally unsustainable and should never have gotten off the drawing board, Mulcair contends a cross-Canada pipeline would keep construction and refining jobs in Canada rather than exporting them to the United States.

Keystone pipeline backed by coalition of Democrats, Republicans, labor, business

WASHINGTON - An unusual coalition that includes Republicans, Democrats, labour leaders, business leaders, veterans groups and Canada's ambassador to the United States joined forces Tuesday to push for quick approval of the Keystone XL pipeline.
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