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Venezuela leaders must start talks, stop arrests

US Secretary of State John Kerry Friday urged Venezuelan leaders to talk to their own people and stop a wave of arrests as he revealed hopes of finding a way to mediate an end to the crisis. "It seems to me what has to happen now is for (the) Venezuelan leadership to deal with their own people," Kerry told reporters. "They need to reach out and have a dialogue, and bring people together and resolve their problems," he said.

Kerry stays mum on Keystone pipeline deliberations

US Secretary of State John Kerry Wednesday refused to give away any hint on whether he will approve a controversial Canada to US oil pipeline, saying he was intensely studying the plan. The Keystone XL pipeline, first proposed in 2008, is slated to cross US borders bringing oil from the tar sands of Alberta to refineries in the US state of Nebraska and then further south to Texas. But it has been long delayed awaiting an environmental review from the State Department, and a final recommendation from Kerry, who has long been a passionate advocate for the environment.

We need to pull together to save oceans

US Secretary of State John Kerry warned royalty, corporate kings and environmental warriors Tuesday that governments won't save the seas without "significant impetus" from every sphere of society. Kerry's comments came via video link to a large gathering at the scenic Half Moon Bay, California that has brought together countries big and small to find ways to prevent oceans and seas being destroyed by a rapacious global appetite for food and resources.

Kerry rebukes Venezuela for 'unacceptable' use of force

US Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday condemned Venezuela's "unacceptable" use of force against anti-government protesters, and declined to respond to an offer from Caracas for bilateral talks. "The government's use of force and judicial intimidation against citizens and political figures, who are exercising a legitimate right to protest, is unacceptable and will only increase the likelihood of violence," Kerry said in a statement. "This is not how democracies behave." oh/ch

Kerry rebukes Venezuela for 'unacceptable' use of force

US Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday condemned Venezuela's "unacceptable" use of force against anti-government protesters, and declined to respond to an offer from Caracas for bilateral talks. "The government's use of force and judicial intimidation against citizens and political figures, who are exercising a legitimate right to protest, is unacceptable and will only increase the likelihood of violence," Kerry said in a statement. "This is not how democracies behave." oh/ch

(News Focus) Kerry injects some vigor into Asia 'pivot'

By Lee Chi-dong JAKARTA, Feb. 17 (Yonhap) -- U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has provided a much-needed boost to the Barack Obama administration's rebalancing toward Asia, as he wraps up a whistle-stop tour of three key regional countries. Some questioned his role in the U.S. policy on Asia. He spent much of his time and energy in grappling with Syria, Iran and other Middle East issues over the first 10 months as Washington's top diplomat.

U.S. stresses commitment to defend Japan in Washington talks

By David Brunnstrom WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States on Friday stressed its commitment to the defense of Japan and stability in the Asia-Pacific region against a backdrop of increasingly assertive territorial claims by China. After a meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, Secretary of State John Kerry emphasized the importance of the U.S.-Japan relationship, which both countries say remains robust in spite of a bump after Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited a controversial war shrine in December.

U.S. stresses commitment to defend Japan in Washington talks

By David Brunnstrom WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States on Friday stressed its commitment to the defense of Japan and stability in the Asia-Pacific region against a backdrop of increasingly assertive territorial claims by China. After a meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, Secretary of State John Kerry emphasized the importance of the U.S.-Japan relationship, which both countries say remains robust in spite of a bump after Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited a controversial war shrine in December.

Kerry to visit China, S. Korea next week

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Friday he will visit Asian countries including China next week for talks with leaders such as his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi, mainly on North Korea's nuclear programs. Kerry will visit South Korea on Feb. 13 and 14 for possible meetings with President Park Geun Hye and Foreign Minister Yun Byung Se prior to his likely arrival in Beijing on Feb. 14, a diplomatic source said.

U.S. committed to defend Japan over territorial claim in E. China Sea

Japan and the United States agreed during their foreign ministerial talks Friday to work closely to deal with China's territorial claims with Washington reaffirming its commitment to defending Japan under the security treaty including East China Sea waters, officials said. Japan and the United States agreed they will enhance trilateral cooperation with South Korea for the denuclearization of North Korea and work closely so President Barack Obama can visit Japan in April.
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