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No horse meat found in Nestle products: Italy

Italy's health ministry on Saturday said tests carried out on Nestle beef products seized this week had shown they did not contain horse meat. "There was no trace of equine DNA in the cooked and frozen minced beef that was seized from Nestle on February 21," the ministry said in a statement. "The meat will therefore be returned," it added. Nestle, the world's biggest food company, on Monday said it was withdrawing two types of pasta meal from supermarket shelves in Italy and Spain due to contamination that did not constitute a health risk.

Two European food firms pull meals in horsemeat scare

Two major food companies pulled more products from shelves in Britain, Belgium, Ireland and the Netherlands on Friday after discovering horsemeat in ready-made meals labelled as beef. The move came as British food safety authorities revealed that a total of 37 products sold by retailers had now tested positive for equine meat since the start of the scandal that has hit many European countries.

New York City has most top 10 U.S. restaurants - poll

By Richard Leong NEW YORK, Feb 20 (Reuters) - New York City is arguably the top culinary destination in the United States with six of the 10 best restaurants in the country, a survey released on Wednesday showed. The French Laundry in Yountville, California, founded by chef Thomas Keller, was named the best restaurant by a panel of experts, followed by the Gramercy Tavern, Le Bernardin, Momofuku Ssam Bar and Eleven Madison Park, which are all in the Big Apple.

World's biggest food firms embroiled in Europe horsemeat scandal

The world's biggest food company, Swiss-based Nestle, and the world's top beef producer, JBS of Brazil, were Tuesday the latest in a long list of firms to be caught up in Europe's spiralling horsemeat scandal. Their involvement in the fast-moving drama marked another milestone in a scandal that has seen supermarket chains across Europe pull from their shelves millions of "beef" products that are thought to contain horsemeat.

World's biggest food firms embroiled in Europe horsemeat scandal

The world's biggest food company, Swiss-based Nestle, and the world's top beef producer, JBS of Brazil, were Tuesday the latest in a long list of firms to be caught up in Europe's spiralling horsemeat scandal. Their involvement in the fast-moving drama marked another milestone in a scandal that has seen supermarket chains across Europe pull from their shelves millions of "beef" products that are thought to contain horsemeat.

The horsemeat scandal: a timeline

Following are the main developments in the frozen food scandal that erupted in Europe over one month ago: - Mid-January 2013: Horse DNA is found in beefburgers in Britain and Ireland, countries where horsemeat consumption is generally taboo. Millions of beefburgers are removed from sale. - February 7: Britain's Food Standards Agency (FSA) announces that tests confirm that lasagne produced by processed food giant Findus contains up to 100 percent horsemeat.

World's biggest food firms embroiled in Europe horsemeat scandal

The world's biggest food company, Swiss-based Nestle, and the world's top beef producer, JBS of Brazil, were Tuesday the latest in a long list of firms to be caught up in Europe's spiralling horsemeat scandal. Their involvement in the fast-moving drama marked another milestone in a scandal that has seen supermarket chains across Europe pull from their shelves millions of "beef" products that are thought to contain horsemeat.

World's biggest food firms embroiled in Europe horsemeat scandal

The world's biggest food company, Swiss-based Nestle, and the world's top beef producer, JBS of Brazil, were Tuesday the latest in a long list of firms to be embroiled in Europe's spiralling horsemeat scandal. Their involvement in the fast-moving drama marked another milestone in a scandal that has seen supermarket chains across Europe pull from their shelves millions of "beef" products that are thought to contain horsemeat.

French horsemeat scandal firm resumes work as ban eased

The French firm that sparked a Europe-wide food scandal by allegedly passing off 750 tonnes of horsemeat as beef was allowed Monday to resume production of minced meat, sausages and ready-to-eat meals. But Spanghero, whose horsemeat found its way into 4.5 million "beef" products sold across Europe, will no longer be allowed to stock frozen meat, Agriculture Minister Stephane Le Foll told AFP.

The horsemeat scandal: a timeline

Below are the main developments in the frozen food scandal that erupted in Europe one month ago: - Mid-January 2013: Equine DNA is found in beefburgers in Britain and Ireland, countries where horsemeat consumption is generally taboo. Millions of beefburgers are removed from sale. - February 7: Britain's Food Standards Agency (FSA) announces that tests confirm that lasagne produced by processed food giant Findus contains up to 100 percent horsemeat.
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