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'Vapers' relieved FDA won't restrict popular e-cigarette flavors

By Curtis Skinner NEW YORK (Reuters) - E-cigarette users breathed a sigh of relief on Thursday after U.S. health officials proposed new rules for the devices that would ban sales to minors, but allow manufacturers to keep offering flavored nicotine liquids beloved by so-called vapers. Mcshalonic Martinez, 25, puffed on a caramel mochachino flavored e-cigarette at the Henley Vaporium in lower Manhattan, saying the device helped him kick his three-pack-a-day smoking habit. He can't imagine going back to traditional cigarettes.

US moves to regulate e-cigarettes

US regulators proposed the first restrictions on the soaring $2 billion market in e-cigarettes Thursday, but some lawmakers and anti-tobacco advocates said the move falls woefully short. The new rules would also apply to other, also previously unregulated tobacco products, including cigars, hookahs, nicotine gels, and pipe tobacco, and are aimed in large part at keeping them away from young people. E-cigarettes are battery-operated devices that deliver vaporized nicotine into an aerosol inhaled by the user.

Electronic cigarettes: How they work, what's in them and who smokes them

ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES: The battery-powered devices made of plastic or metal heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapour that users inhale. Some models are disposable, and some are designed to be refilled with cartridges or tanks containing what enthusiasts call "e-juice." Some e-cigarettes are made to look like a real cigarette with a tiny light on the tip that glows like the real thing.

Feds propose e-cigarette regulations, including banning sales to minors, new product approval

WASHINGTON - The federal government wants to ban sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels. While the proposal being issued Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration won't immediately mean changes for the popular devices, the move is aimed at eventually taming the fast-growing e-cigarette industry. The agency said the proposal sets a foundation for regulating the products but the rules don't immediately ban the wide array of flavours of e-cigarettes, curb marketing on places like TV or set product standards.

U.S. proposal would ban e-cigarette sales to minors, allow advertising

By Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed rules on Thursday that would ban the sale of e-cigarettes to anyone under 18, but would not restrict flavored products, online sales or advertising, which public health advocates say attract children. The long-awaited proposal, which would subject the $2 billion industry to federal regulation for the first time, is not as restrictive as some companies had feared and will likely take years to become fully effective.

E-cigarettes to be regulated under new US plan

US regulators proposed new restrictions Thursday on the soaring $2 billion market in e-cigarettes, which until now have been free from federal oversight. The changes would also apply to other, previously unregulated tobacco products, including cigars, hookahs, nicotine gels, and pipe tobacco, and are aimed in large part at keeping these substances away from young people. "This proposed rule is the latest step in our efforts to make the next generation tobacco-free," said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in a press release announcing the reform.

Marlboro maker Altria's 1Q profit falls on lower cigarette sales, year-ago comparison

RICHMOND, Va. - Altria Group Inc.'s first-quarter profit dropped 15 per cent as the Marlboro maker sold fewer cigarettes and its year-ago results benefited from lower expenses from a longstanding legal settlement. The owner of the nation's biggest cigarette maker, Philip Morris USA, said Thursday that its cigarette shipments fell 2.5 per cent to 29 billion cigarettes during the quarter. Adjusting for trade inventory changes, cigarette volumes fell 3.5 per cent, compared with the total industry decline of about 4 per cent.

E-cigarettes to be regulated under new US plan

US regulators proposed new restrictions Thursday on the soaring $2 billion market in e-cigarettes, which until now have been free from federal oversight. The changes would also apply to other, previously unregulated tobacco products, including cigars, hookahs, nicotine gels, and pipe tobacco, and are aimed in large part at keeping these substances away from young people. "This proposed rule is the latest step in our efforts to make the next generation tobacco-free," said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in a press release announcing the reform.

Timeline of electronic cigarettes milestones leading to proposed FDA regulations

Late 2006: Electronic cigarettes first marketed in U.S. via kiosks in shopping malls and online. Early 2009: E-cigarette sellers sue the Food and Drug Administration after the agency told customs officials to refuse entry of shipments into U.S. June 2009: The Food and Drug Administration said testing of products from two leading electronic cigarette makers turned up several toxic chemicals, including a key ingredient in antifreeze. January 2010: Federal judge rules that the FDA can't stop those shipments, saying the agency had overstepped its authority.

Revised deal on court-ordered ads in tobacco lawsuit will reach more of black community

WASHINGTON - The nation's tobacco companies and the Justice Department are including media outlets that target more of the black community in court-ordered advertisements that say the cigarette makers lied about the dangers of smoking, according to a brief filed in U.S. District Court in Washington on Wednesday.
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