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Longest-serving Pentagon comptroller since 1950s to step down

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Pentagon budget chief Robert Hale, the department's longest-serving comptroller since the 1950s, has decided to step down after a five-year tenure that spanned a shift from peak wartime spending to shrinking budgets in a period of fiscal uncertainty. The Pentagon confirmed Hale's decision to leave on Friday after the White House - in a note to Congress on Thursday - nominated his top deputy, Michael McCord, to replace him as undersecretary of defense (comptroller).

US says 92 nuclear officers tied to cheating scandal

The US Air Force said on Thursday that 92 nuclear missile officers are now implicated in a widening scandal over cheating on exams and have been suspended from their duties. In the latest setback for the troubled nuclear mission, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said she returned from a visit to missile bases convinced the cheating problem was part of broader "systemic problems" among launch officers related to morale.

U.S. government names Navy man to head beleaguered NSA

By David Alexander and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama nominated on Thursday the U.S. Navy's top cyber warrior to head the National Security Agency, a move seen as a vote of confidence in a unit that is under fire for spying on Americans and their allies. Navy Vice Admiral Michael Rogers, a cryptologist and head of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command, is not expected to immediately make major changes to the NSA, shaken by revelations by former contractor Edward Snowden.

US says 92 nuclear officers tied to cheating scandal

The US Air Force said Thursday that 92 nuclear missile officers are now implicated in a widening scandal over cheating on exams as officials cited "systemic problems" in the force. In the latest setback for the troubled nuclear mission, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said she returned from a visit to missile bases believing the cheating was part of a broader morale problem among launch officers.

US says 92 nuclear officers tied to cheating scandal

The US Air Force said on Thursday that 92 nuclear missile officers are now implicated in a widening scandal over cheating on exams and have been suspended from their duties. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said she returned from a visit to missile bases convinced there were "systemic problems" among crew members related to morale, referring to a climate of "undue stress and fear." "As the investigation has moved forward, we can now report there is a total of 92 crew members that have been identified as having some level of involvement," James told a news conference.

US says 92 nuclear officers tied to cheating scandal

The US Air Force said on Thursday that 92 nuclear missile officers are now implicated in a growing scandal over cheating on exams and have been suspended from their duties. "As the investigation has moved forward, we can now report there is a total of 92 crew members that have been identified as having some level of involvement," said Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James. Two weeks ago, officials said 34 officers were implicated in the problem. ddl/jm

Amid test scandal, U.S. Air Force sees 'systemic problem' in ranks

By Phil Stewart WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Air Force is likely suffering from a "systemic problem" among the officers who oversee America's nuclear missile launch systems, the new head of the military branch said on Wednesday as an exam-cheating scandal widened. "The need for perfection has created way too much stress and way too much fear about the future," Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told an Air Force Association forum near the Pentagon.

Amid test scandal, U.S. Air Force sees 'systemic problem' in ranks

By Phil Stewart WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Air Force is likely suffering from a "systemic problem" among the officers who oversee America's nuclear missile launch systems, the new head of the military branch said on Wednesday as an exam-cheating scandal widened. "The need for perfection has created way too much stress and way too much fear about the future," Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told an Air Force Association forum near the Pentagon.

Amid test scandal, U.S. Air Force sees 'systemic problem' in ranks

By Phil Stewart WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Air Force is likely suffering from a "systemic problem" among the officers who oversee America's nuclear missile launch systems, the new head of the military branch said on Wednesday as an exam-cheating scandal widened. "The need for perfection has created way too much stress and way too much fear about the future," Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told an Air Force Association forum near the Pentagon.

Amid test scandal, U.S. Air Force sees 'systemic problem' in ranks

By Phil Stewart WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Air Force is likely suffering from a "systemic problem" among the officers who oversee America's nuclear missile launch systems, the new head of the military branch said on Wednesday as an exam-cheating scandal widened. "The need for perfection has created way too much stress and way too much fear about the future," Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told an Air Force Association forum near the Pentagon.
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