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Alaska marijuana legalization vote delayed until November because of late legislative session

JUNEAU, Alaska - A ballot measure that could make Alaska the third state to legalize the recreational use of marijuana is getting pushed back to the November ballot because lawmakers couldn't end their session on time. State election officials confirmed Monday that the marijuana initiative and two others can't be on the Aug. 19 primary ballot. State law requires at least 120 days between the legislative session and the election for initiatives.

Alaska Legislature passes bill to advance major liquefied natural gas project

JUNEAU, Alaska - The Alaska Legislature has passed a bill setting the state's participation in a major liquefied natural gas project. The House voted 36-4 on the measure Sunday. The Senate later voted 16-4 to agree to the House changes. SB138, from Gov. Sean Parnell, would set state participation at about 25 per cent in a project also being pursued TransCanada, the Alaska Gasline Development Corp., and the North Slope's major players. It would allow the project to move to a stage of preliminary engineering and design and cost refinement.

Canucks owners join aboriginal businessman to pitch their own pipeline for BC

VANCOUVER - An aboriginal businessman and former motivational speaker has teamed with the British Columbia billionaires best known for their ownership of the Vancouver Canucks to pitch an alternative to the struggling Northern Gateway pipeline. Calvin Helin, CEO of Eagle Spirit Energy, said the project would include a pipeline linking the Alberta oil sands to a tanker terminal on the B.C. coast. It would also include an upgrader to refine the heavy bitumen oil produced in the oil sands to a lighter, more conventional and less controversial product, he said.

Supreme Court rejects Alaska appeal over fishing, hunting rights for Alaska Natives

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has turned away an appeal by the state of Alaska in a long-running fight over the control of rivers and the fishing and hunting rights of Alaska Natives. The court on Monday declined to review a federal appeals court ruling that upheld U.S. Interior Department rules enforcing the fishing and hunting rights on some rivers that otherwise would be under state control. The state urged the high court to step in to address claims that the federal government has improperly asserted control over rivers in more than half of Alaska.

B.C. oil pipeline opponents mark 25th anniversary of Exxon Valdez spill

VANCOUVER - Opponents of any increase in oil tankers off the B.C. coast are marking the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill by launching a renewed campaign against two major pipeline projects. Coastal First Nations are running newspaper and radio ads about the impacts they fear from oil spills at sea from Enbridge's (TSX:ENB) Northern Gateway and Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipelines. The coalition of aboriginal communities along the B.C. coast are asking residents to support a ban on oil tankers in their traditional territories.

AFPTV-Advisory 1000GMT

LONDON, March 22, 2014 (AFP) - We will file the following videos on Sunday. Please check the daily advisories for any additions and amendments: -- TOP WORLD NEWS - + MALAYSIAN JET Coming up: CANBERRA/KUALA LUMPUR: Monitoring the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet. RAW. TBC Filed over past 12 hours:

Bitterness over Exxon Valdez lingers, 25 years on

On a cold March night 25 years ago, the supertanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef off the coast of Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the sea. Images of oil-soaked birds and fouled beaches horrified the United States, leading to tighter regulation and greater environmental consciousness. The Exxon Valdez grounding on March 24, 1989, has since been replaced by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico as the worst oil spill in US history. Yet local communities in the formerly pristine Prince William Sound are suffering.

Bitterness over Exxon Valdez lingers, 25 years on

On a cold March night 25 years ago, the supertanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef off the coast of Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the sea. Images of oil-soaked birds and fouled beaches horrified the United States, leading to tighter regulation and greater environmental consciousness. The Exxon Valdez grounding on March 24, 1989, has since been replaced by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico as the worst oil spill in US history. Yet local communities in the formerly pristine Prince William Sound are suffering.

25 years after Exxon Valdez, some damage heals, some effects linger in Prince William Sound

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico, there was the Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, at the time the nation's largest oil spill. The 987-foot tanker, carrying 53 million gallons of crude, struck Bligh Reef at 12:04 a.m. on March 24, 1989. Within hours, it unleashed an estimated 10.8 million gallons of thick, toxic crude oil into the water. Storms and currents then smeared it over 1,300 miles of shoreline.

1989 Exxon Valdez disaster, then world's worst oil spill, as reported by The Associated Press

EDITOR'S NOTE: Early on March 24, 1989, Dean Fosdick, the Alaska bureau chief of The Associated Press, was awakened around 5:30 a.m. by a phone call. The caller had a tip that a tanker had run aground outside Valdez. Fosdick quickly confirmed with a top Coast Guard official that the Exxon Valdez had struck a reef and was leaking thick, toxic crude oil into Prince William Sound, and sent out first word to the world of what at the time was the nation's worst-ever oil spill.
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