Connect to share and comment

Top UN court orders Japan to end Antarctic whale hunt

The United Nations' top court on Monday ordered Japan to end its annual Antarctic whale hunt, saying in a landmark ruling that the programme was a commercial activity disguised as science. "Japan shall revoke any existent authorisation, permit or licence granted in relation to JARPA II (research programme) and refrain from granting any further permits," said the International Court of Justice's Judge Peter Tomka.

Top UN court orders Japan to end Antarctic whale hunt

The UN's top court on Monday ordered Japan to end its annual Antarctic whale hunt, saying in a landmark ruling that the programme was a commercial activity disguised as science. "Japan shall revoke any existant authorisation, permit or licence granted in relation to JARPA II (research programme) and refrain from granting any further permits," said the International Court of Justice's Judge Peter Tomka.

Japan says to abide by UN court's Antarctic whaling ban

Japan said Monday it would respect an International Court of Justice order to end its annual Antarctic whale hunt, despite "deep disappointment" with the landmark decision. "As a state that respects the rule of law... and as a responsible member of the global community, Japan will abide by the decision of the court," chief negotiator Koji Tsuruoka told reporters outside the United Nations' top court in The Hague. jhe/cjo/yad

World court rules Japan's whaling not for scientific ends, revokes permits

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Japan's whaling program in seas near Antarctica is not for scientific purposes, judges at the U.N.'s highest court ruled on Monday, agreeing with Australia that Tokyo should revoke permits to catch and kill whales for research purposes. Australia, which brought the case before the International Court of Justice in The Hague in 2010, had argued that Japan's assertion that it was carrying out scientific research was a figleaf to justify what was in fact pure commercial whaling.

Australia welcomes ICJ ruling on Japanese whaling

Australian Attorney General George Brandis said Monday his country welcomes the International Court of Justice's decision ruling Japanese research whaling in the Antarctic is not for scientific purposes and must stop. Speaking in Perth, Brandis said, "We note that both Australia and Japan have stated on a number of occasions that both countries would accept and respect the decision of the Court. Now we haven't yet had the opportunity to consider in detail the reasons of the judgment."

Top UN court orders Japan to end Antarctic whale hunt

The UN's top court on Monday ordered Japan to stop its annual whale hunt in the Antarctic, rejecting Tokyo's argument that it is for scientific purposes. "Japan shall revoke any existant authorisation, permit or licence granted in relation to Jarpa II (research programme) and refrain from granting any further permits in pursuance to the programme," the International Court of Justice's Judge Peter Tomka said. jhe-cjo/yad

UN top court rules on Japan's Antarctic whale hunt

The UN's top International Court of Justice will rule Monday whether Japan has the right to hunt whales in the Antarctic, in an emotive case activists say is make-or-break for the giant mammal's future. Presiding Judge Peter Tomka began reading the court's lengthy ruling on the matter at 0800 GMT at the ICJ's headquarters at the Peace Palace in The Hague. Australia in 2010 hauled Japan to the ICJ in an attempt to torpedo whale hunting in the Southern Ocean, a practice Canberra says is a thinly-disguised commercial exploit under cover of scientific research.

UN top court to rule on Japan whale hunt in Antarctic

The UN's top International Court of Justice will rule Monday whether Japan has the right to hunt whales in the Antarctic, in an emotive case activists say is make-or-break for the giant mammal's future. Presiding Judge Peter Tomka is to read the court's ruling on the matter at 0800 GMT at the ICJ's historic headquarters at the Peace Palace in The Hague. Australia in 2010 hauled Japan to the ICJ in an attempt to torpedo whale hunting in the Southern Ocean, a practice Canberra says is a thinly-disguised commercial exploit under cover of scientific research.

Top UN court to rule on legality of Japan whale hunt

The UN's top court will rule Monday whether Japan has the right to hunt whales in the Antarctic, in an emotive case activists say is make-or-break for the giant mammal's future. Australia in 2010 hauled Japan to the Hague-based International Court of Justice (ICJ), accusing Tokyo of exploiting a loophole by hunting whales as scientific research, despite a 1986 ban on commercial whaling. Australia has asked the world court to order Japan to stop its JARPA II research programme and "revoke any authorisations, permits or licences" to hunt whales in the Southern Ocean.

Huge sea creatures evolved into feeding off plankton in Cambrian period

London, Mar 27 (EFE).- Huge marine creatures that lived more than 500 million years ago evolved from hunting large prey into feeding off plankton just like modern whales, the journal Nature reported. A team led by Jakob Vinther, a palaeobiologist at Britain's University of Bristol, discovered the fossils of Tamisiocaris borealis in Greenland in 2009. The shrimp-like creature lived in the Cambrian period, the first of the six periods of the Paleozoic Era. Scientists examined the fossils and concluded that the creatures had sharp claws used to catch prey.
Syndicate content