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Australia welcomes ICJ ruling on Japanese whaling

Australian Attorney General George Brandis said Monday his country welcomes the International Court of Justice's decision ruling Japanese research whaling in the Antarctic is not for scientific purposes and must stop. Speaking in Perth, Brandis said, "We note that both Australia and Japan have stated on a number of occasions that both countries would accept and respect the decision of the Court. Now we haven't yet had the opportunity to consider in detail the reasons of the judgment."

Top UN court orders Japan to end Antarctic whale hunt

The UN's top court on Monday ordered Japan to stop its annual whale hunt in the Antarctic, rejecting Tokyo's argument that it is for scientific purposes. "Japan shall revoke any existant authorisation, permit or licence granted in relation to Jarpa II (research programme) and refrain from granting any further permits in pursuance to the programme," the International Court of Justice's Judge Peter Tomka said. jhe-cjo/yad

UN top court rules on Japan's Antarctic whale hunt

The UN's top International Court of Justice will rule Monday whether Japan has the right to hunt whales in the Antarctic, in an emotive case activists say is make-or-break for the giant mammal's future. Presiding Judge Peter Tomka began reading the court's lengthy ruling on the matter at 0800 GMT at the ICJ's headquarters at the Peace Palace in The Hague. Australia in 2010 hauled Japan to the ICJ in an attempt to torpedo whale hunting in the Southern Ocean, a practice Canberra says is a thinly-disguised commercial exploit under cover of scientific research.

UN top court to rule on Japan whale hunt in Antarctic

The UN's top International Court of Justice will rule Monday whether Japan has the right to hunt whales in the Antarctic, in an emotive case activists say is make-or-break for the giant mammal's future. Presiding Judge Peter Tomka is to read the court's ruling on the matter at 0800 GMT at the ICJ's historic headquarters at the Peace Palace in The Hague. Australia in 2010 hauled Japan to the ICJ in an attempt to torpedo whale hunting in the Southern Ocean, a practice Canberra says is a thinly-disguised commercial exploit under cover of scientific research.

Top UN court to rule on legality of Japan whale hunt

The UN's top court will rule Monday whether Japan has the right to hunt whales in the Antarctic, in an emotive case activists say is make-or-break for the giant mammal's future. Australia in 2010 hauled Japan to the Hague-based International Court of Justice (ICJ), accusing Tokyo of exploiting a loophole by hunting whales as scientific research, despite a 1986 ban on commercial whaling. Australia has asked the world court to order Japan to stop its JARPA II research programme and "revoke any authorisations, permits or licences" to hunt whales in the Southern Ocean.

Huge sea creatures evolved into feeding off plankton in Cambrian period

London, Mar 27 (EFE).- Huge marine creatures that lived more than 500 million years ago evolved from hunting large prey into feeding off plankton just like modern whales, the journal Nature reported. A team led by Jakob Vinther, a palaeobiologist at Britain's University of Bristol, discovered the fossils of Tamisiocaris borealis in Greenland in 2009. The shrimp-like creature lived in the Cambrian period, the first of the six periods of the Paleozoic Era. Scientists examined the fossils and concluded that the creatures had sharp claws used to catch prey.

All of trapped dolphins off Newfoundland have died: Fisheries Department

PORT AUX BASQUES, N.L. - Fisheries officers say all of the 30 or so white-beaked dolphins that were trapped in pack ice off Newfoundland have died. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans says it is likely that by the time the ice breaks in the Cape Ray area the carcasses of the animals will have been dispersed by the current. It says the provincial and municipal governments are responsible for the removal of any animal carcasses that wash ashore.

Dolphins die after they get trapped in ice off southwestern Newfoundland

PORT AUX BASQUES, N.L. - A whale rescue expert says the area off southwestern Newfoundland where 30 or so white-beaked dolphins were spotted trapped in pack ice on the weekend is notorious for such strandings. Wayne Ledwell, head of Whale Release and Strandings in Portugal Cove-St. Philip's, N.L., said the dolphins were first spotted Sunday night near Cape Ray. By late Monday afternoon, all but three of the mammals had died, the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans said.

Dolphin pod dies trapped in ice off Canadian coast

Some 30 white-beaked dolphins have died after being trapped in ice off the coast of Canada's easternmost Newfoundland province, and three remaining alive are not faring well, officials said Monday. Canadian fisheries officials twice visited the area around Cape Ray, Newfoundland where the animals were reported to have been trapped on Sunday and again Monday morning. "All but three animals have died," ministry spokesman Larry Vaters told AFP.

A whale of a find: Fossil sheds light on cetacean sonar's origin

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The deadly threat posed by German submarines during World War One helped spur scientists to develop sonar, using underwater sound signals to locate objects like subs that might be taking aim with a torpedo. In the 20th century, it was an important technological breakthrough. But it was old technology as far as whales go. These marine mammals have been using echolocation - bouncing high-frequency sounds off underwater objects - to find prey for tens of millions of years.
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