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Hawking: latest Big Bang study confirms cosmic inflation

London, Mar 18 (EFE).- British scientist Stephen Hawking said Tuesday that the detection of gravitational waves set off by the Big Bang creation of the universe is "another confirmation" of the cosmic inflation discovered more than 30 years ago. In a statement Tuesday on BBC Radio 4, the Cambridge University cosmologist recalled that this inflation was first conceived by Alan Guth, who said that in the creation of the universe, there was a period of acceleration, a hyper-expansion, which in turn explains why the universe looks almost the same in every direction.

Astronomers discover echoes from expansion after Big Bang

By Irene Klotz and Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - Astronomers announced on Monday that they had discovered what many consider the holy grail of their field: ripples in the fabric of space-time that are echoes of the massive expansion of the universe that took place just after the Big Bang.

Major discovery bolsters Big Bang theory of universe

Waves of gravity that rippled through space right after the Big Bang have been detected for the first time, in a landmark discovery that adds to our understanding of how the universe was born, US scientists said Monday. The waves were produced in a rapid growth spurt 14 billion years ago, and were predicted in Albert Einstein's nearly century-old theory of general relativity but were never found until now.

Major discovery bolsters Big Bang theory of universe

Waves of gravity that rippled through space right after the Big Bang have been detected for the first time, in a landmark discovery for understanding how the universe was born, US scientists said Monday. The waves are evidence of a rapid growth spurt 14 billion years ago, and provide a long-awaited answer to the last untested element of Albert Einstein's nearly century-old theory of general relativity. The "first direct evidence of cosmic inflation" was announced by experts at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Scientists hear echoes of Big Bang

In a major discovery for understanding the origins of the universe, US scientists said Monday they have detected echoes of the Big Bang 14 billion years ago. The "first direct evidence of cosmic inflation" was found by a telescope at the South Pole, and was announced by experts at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. ksh/jm

Scientists detect echoes of Big Bang

In a major discovery for understanding the origins of the universe, US scientists said Monday they have detected echoes of the Big Bang 14 billion years ago. The "first direct evidence of cosmic inflation" was found with the help of a telescope at the South Pole, and was announced by experts at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The detection of these gravitational waves represents the last untested element of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, filling in a major gap in our understanding of how the universe was born.

Radiation levels uncertain as workers prepare to enter underground New Mexico nuke dump

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Specially trained workers are finalizing plans to enter the nation's only underground nuclear waste dump after two separate incidents forced its closure weeks ago, including a leak that exposed more than a dozen workers to low levels of radiation. Officials with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant say initial testing shows there's no contamination at an air intake shaft that leads into the mine or at the bottom of the mine's salt shaft.

'Tribo-electric,' the buzzword of the future?

Out at sea, gentle waves provide power for thousands of homes. In cities, dancefloor moves generate electricity for nightclubs. In the countryside, hikers use leg power to recharge their phones. It is an alluring goal of clean, reliable power free from geo-political risks -- and scientists in the United States said Tuesday it lies within reach, thanks to a smart way to harvest energy called tribo-electricity. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology said they had built a simple prototype device that converts stop-start movement into power.

It's a solid... it's a liquid... it's a dropleton

Scientists said Wednesday they had discovered a new type of microscopic particle cluster that is found in solid materials but strangely behaves like a liquid. They called it the "dropleton". The new entity, infinitely small and with a blink-and-you-miss-it lifespan, is a quasiparticle -- a combination of other, fundamental particles with unusual properties that exist in solids.

It's a solid... it's a liquid... it's a dropleton

Scientists said Wednesday they had discovered a new type of microscopic particle cluster that is found in solid materials but strangely behaves like a liquid. They called it the "dropleton". The new entity, infinitely small and with a blink-and-you-miss-it lifespan, is a quasiparticle -- a combination of other, fundamental particles with unusual properties that exist in solids.
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