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Higgs discovered Nobel win news through ex-neighbour

Professor Peter Higgs only found out he had won the Nobel Prize for Physics when a former neighbour congratulated him on the news, he said Friday. The British scientist and his Belgian colleague Francois Englert were jointly awarded the prize on Tuesday for their work on the Higgs Boson particle. But the 84-year-old said the first he heard of it was when a woman stopped to congratulate him in the street. The former neighbour had got out of her car as he was returning from lunch in Edinburgh.

Factbox: The 2013 Nobel Prize Season

LONDON (Reuters) - Here is a look at who has won the Nobel prizes for 2013: * Physiology or Medicine: James E. Rothman (United States) Randy W. Schekman (United States) Thomas C. Suedhof (Germany, United States) - For - plotting how cells transfer vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals to other cells, giving insight into diseases such as Alzheimer's, autism and diabetes.

Factbox: The 2013 Nobel Prize Season

LONDON (Reuters) - Here is a look at who has won the Nobel prizes for 2013: * Physiology or Medicine: James E. Rothman (United States) Randy W. Schekman (United States) Thomas C. Suedhof (Germany United States) - For - plotting how cells transfer vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals to other cells, giving insight into diseases such as Alzheimer's, autism and diabetes.

MHI wins orders for key component of ITER experimental reactor

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. said Thursday it has won orders to manufacture three toroidal field coils, a key component of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor or ITER currently under construction in France, for about 35.5 billion yen. Production has started at the Japanese heavy machinery maker's factory in Akashi, Hyogo Prefecture, for completion by 2016.

Nobel academy member says physics decision 'wrong'

A member of the Swedish institution that awards the Nobel prize for physics publicly contested this year's award, saying the honour for two physicists should have included the CERN laboratory which proved their theories. "I think it's wrong," Anders Barany, a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences told AFP, commenting after the decision Tuesday, which was delayed for an hour due to "a lot of discussion". "I think those experimental researchers have done incredibly fantastic work and should be rewarded."

Jury member says Nobel physics decision 'wrong'

The Nobel Prize in Physics should also have gone to the CERN laboratory in Switzerland, a member of the awarding committee said Wednesday. "I think it's wrong," Anders Barany, a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences told AFP, commenting after the decision Tuesday, which was delayed for an hour due to "a lot of discussion." "I think those experimental researchers have done incredibly fantastic work and should be rewarded."

Group of Canadian researchers rejoice in 'God particle' Nobel win

VANCOUVER - There was celebrating among a group of Canadian scientists Tuesday as Britain's Peter Higgs and Belgian colleague Francois Englert won the Nobel Prize in physics for helping to explain how matter formed after the Big Bang. About 150 Canadians were part of an international network whose research helped to discover the so-called "God particle" — a subatomic particle Higgs and Englert theorized was the hinge to how the fundamental building blocks of the universe clumped together, gained mass and formed everything we see around us today.

Higgs boson, key to the universe, wins Nobel physics prize

By Simon Johnson and Johan Ahlander STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Britain's Peter Higgs and Francois Englert of Belgium won the Nobel Prize for physics on Tuesday for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle that explains how elementary matter attained the mass to form stars and planets. The insight has been hailed as one of the most important in the understanding of the cosmos. Without the Higgs mechanism all particles would travel at the speed of light and atoms would not exist.

'Dark universe' beckons as research target after Higgs boson wins Nobel

By Robert Evans GENEVA (Reuters) - With the Higgs boson in the bag, the head of the CERN research center urged scientists on Tuesday to push on to unveil the "dark universe" - the hidden stuff that makes up 95 per cent of the cosmos and is still a mystery to earthbound researchers. Rolf Heuer spoke after the Nobel physics prize went to Briton Peter Higgs and Belgian Francois Englert for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle, which explains how fundamental matter got the mass to form stars and planets.

'God Particle' Nobel ticks boson box for CERN

The reflected glory of a Nobel prize for the minds behind the "God particle" sent champagne corks popping at Europe's top physics lab CERN Tuesday, vindicating its landmark discovery a year ago. The Nobel Physics Prize for Britain's Peter Higgs and Belgium's Francois Englert came 15 months after CERN announced it had flushed out what appeared to be the Higgs boson, a key building block of the Universe.
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