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Venezuelans bang pots, pans to protest president

Armed with cooking pots in a potent symbol of Venezuela's chronic food shortages, several thousand people took to the streets of Caracas Saturday in the latest rally against President Nicolas Maduro. The protests, which fell on International Women's Day, consisted mostly of women who noisily clanged their cookware to show discontent at scarce basic goods and a violent crime crisis they say has embittered daily life.

Venezuelans hoist pots and pans to protest president

Armed with cooking pots in a potent symbol of Venezuela's chronic food shortages, several thousand people took to the streets of Caracas Saturday in the latest rally against President Nicolas Maduro. The protests, which fell on International Women's Day, consisted mostly of women who noisily clanged their cookware to show their discontent over a scarcity of basic goods and insecurity they say has become a part of daily life.

Venezuela opposition holds new protest

Armed with cooking pots in a potent symbol of Venezuela's chronic food shortage, thousands took to the streets Saturday in the latest public rally against the government of President Nicolas Maduro. The protest, which fell on International Women's Day, consisted mostly of female demonstrators who noisily clanged their cookware to show their discontent over scarcity of basic goods and insecurity they say has become a part of daily life.

Venezuela opposition gears up for new protest

Venezuelans will march again on Saturday against the country's chronic food shortage, one of the major grievances in a wave of protests shadowing President Nicolas Maduro's government. At least 20 people have now died in Venezuela since protests first erupted a month ago, giving Maduro his biggest test since succeeding late leader Hugo Chavez almost a year ago. The new rally was called by the country's most prominent opposition leader, two-time presidential election runner-up Henrique Capriles, who lost to Maduro by a whisker in the April 2013 election.

Maduro rejects international mediation for Venezuela

Washington, Mar 7 (EFE).- Venezuela has no need of international mediators to resolve the tensions that have sparked weeks of protests blamed for 19 deaths, President Nicolas Maduro said in an interview broadcast Friday by CNN. "I think that (what) we need is cooperation. Cooperation. Venezuelans have a long history. So we are able to listen to each other, to talk to each other," the leftist head of state told CNN's Christiane Amanpour.

Maduro rejects international mediation for Venezuela

Washington, Mar 7 (EFE).- Venezuela has no need of international mediators to resolve the tensions that have sparked weeks of protests blamed for 19 deaths, President Nicolas Maduro said in an interview broadcast Friday by CNN. "I think that (what) we need is cooperation. Cooperation. Venezuelans have a long history. So we are able to listen to each other, to talk to each other," the leftist head of state told CNN's Christiane Amanpour.

Maduro blames 'minority' for Venezuela violence

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro blamed the month-old unrest shaking his country on a "minority" that has left the opposition in a difficult situation. In an interview with CNN, Maduro also renewed his call for establishing a new level of relations with the United States after years of frosty relations. "My message (to the US) is: respect, dialogue, that we overcome the visions they have of our country," Maduro said. "Our message to those who rule the US is respect Venezuela, respect Latin America and let's establish new levels of relations."

Maduro wants South America to meet on Venezuela crisis

President Nicolas Maduro called Thursday for a meeting of South American leaders on the turmoil in Venezuela after more than a month of anti-government street protests. Maduro made the request to visiting Suriname President Desi Bouterse, the current head of the Union of South American Nations (Unasur), a regional bloc that does not include the United States. The move came a day after the Venezuelan leader broke off relations with Panama following its call for a meeting of the rival Washington-based Organization of American States on the crisis.

Maduro wants South America to meet on Venezuela crisis

President Nicolas Maduro on Thursday called for a meeting of South American leaders on the turmoil in Venezuela after more than a month of anti-government street protests. Maduro made the request to visiting Suriname President Desi Bouterse, the current head of the Union of South American Nations (Unasur), a regional bloc that does not include the United States. The move came a day after the Venezuelan president broke off relations with Panama after it called for a meeting of the rival Washington-based Organization of American States on the crisis.

Venezuela breaks relations with Panama over demo talks

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro said Wednesday his government was breaking diplomatic relations with Panama after the country called a meeting of North and Latin American nations over protests in Caracas. Writing on Twitter, Panama President Ricardo Martinelli said that the move was "surprising," adding: "Panama only longs for our sister country to find peace and strengthen its democracy," Earlier, during a ceremony marking the anniversary of Hugo Chavez's death, Maduro said he had also decided to freeze all trade and economic ties with the Central American nation.
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