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In Malala's home, schoolgirls pray for her Nobel in secret

In Malala Yousufzai's home town in Pakistan, schoolfriends hope to see her win the Nobel Peace Prize this week -- but they dream in secret, under pressure from a society deeply ambivalent about the teenage activist. Malala, who survived being shot by the Taliban on October 9 last year, has become a global ambassador for education, feted by celebrities and politicians around the Western world.

Taliban Malala letter response to UN speech

A Pakistani Taliban letter to Malala Yousafzai, the teenage education activist shot by the militants, was a bid to strike back in the publicity stakes following her speech at the UN, analysts said Thursday. Adnan Rasheed, a senior Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) commander, wrote an open letter to Malala accusing her of "smearing" them and of promoting "satanic" values, while urging her to return home.

Malala is now a daughter of the United Nations

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called Malala Yousufzai, the Pakistani education activist, ‘a daughter of the United Nations’ when he spoke to her on Friday to mark the 1,000-day milestone in the run-up to a Millennium Development Goal to reduce poverty by the end of 2015.In a Skype conversation from Madrid, where the secretary-general is on a visit, he described the 15-year-old who was attacked by the Taliban for opposing restrictions on going to school as ‘a symbol of hope, a daughter of the United Nations’, according to a video of the talk released at UN Headquarters in New York.

UN chief describes Malala as a ‘symbol of hope’

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon has described Pakistani rights activist Malala Yousufzai “a symbol of hope, a daughter of the United Nations.”Pakistani rights activist Malala Yousufzai has expressed hope about becoming a leader to serve the world, during a video conversation with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon who described the 14-year old as a “symbol of hope”.“I can walk. I can talk.

Pakistani girl shot by Taliban starts at English school

LONDON (Reuters) - Malala Yousufzai, the Pakistani girl who drew global attention after being shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, returned to school on Tuesday in Britain where she has been treated for her injuries. Yousufzai, 15, has become an international figure as a symbol of resistance to Taliban efforts to deny women's rights and is even among nominees for this year's Nobel Peace Prize. She described her return to school as the most important day of her life.

Pakistani girl shot by Taliban doing well after surgery -doctors

LONDON, Feb 4 (Reuters) - A Pakistani schoolgirl who underwent reconstructive surgery in Britain after being shot in the head by the Taliban said on Monday she felt much better and was focused on her mission to help others. A team of doctors carried out a five-hour operation on fifteen-year-old Malala Yousufzai on Saturday to mend parts of her skull with a titanium plate and help restore hearing on her left side with a cochlear implant.

Pakistani girl shot by Taliban has successful skull surgery

* Malala Yousufzai shot for advocating girls' education * 10-strong team at British hospital performed operation * Skull mended with titanium plate, hearing implant inserted LONDON, Feb 3 (Reuters) - A Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education has undergone successful surgery at a British hospital to reconstruct her skull and help restore lost hearing.

Pakistani girl shot by Taliban to have skull reconstructed

* Malala Yousufzai shot for advocating girls' education * 10-strong team at British hospital to perform operation * Cranioplasty aims to mend skull with titanium plate * Doctors to insert implant to restore damaged hearing By Kate Kelland LONDON, Jan 30 (Reuters) - A Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education is to return to a specialist hospital in Britain for surgery to reconstruct her skull.
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