Connect to share and comment

Venezuela clears protest city's streets

Venezuelan security forces have cleared barricades from the western city that launched the first in a wave of national anti-government protests, a military commander said Monday. Vladimir Padrino, head of the armed forces' strategic operations command, said that police and the national guard had removed the blockades in three key avenues of San Cristobal late Sunday. "We have ended the curfew imposed by terrorism in Carabobo, Ferrero Tamayo and Espana de SC (in San Cristobal) avenues without (causing) victims," Padrino wrote on Twitter.

Ukraine crisis fuels debate on Moscow bid to expand Czech nuclear plant

Russia's moves in Ukraine on Monday sparked splits among Czech officials on Moscow's bid for a multi-billion-dollar contract to expand a Czech nuclear plant. Speaking after Russian troops poured into Ukraine's Black Sea peninsula of Crimea in violation of international accords, the Czech ministers for defence and human rights said they were against the Russian bid.

Dogs ripped kids to pieces in N.Korean camp: ex-guard

Ahn Myong-Chol witnessed many horrors as a North Korean prison camp guard, but few haunt him like the image of guard dogs attacking school children and tearing them to pieces. Ahn, who worked as a prison camp guard for eight years until he fled the country in 1994, recalls the day he saw three dogs get away from their handler and attack children coming back from the camp school. "There were three dogs and they killed five children," the 45-year-old told AFP through a translator.

Turkey: removal of 1,000 police since graft probe is 'routine'

Turkey's interior ministry said 1,000 police officers have been removed in the wake of a major corruption probe against key government allies but said these were only "routine" re-assignments. The government has embarked on a mass purge of police and prosecutors in the wake of the probe launched on December 17 targeting several members of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's inner circle.

At Sochi Games, Putin evokes spirit of 1980

By Timothy Heritage SOCHI, Russia (Reuters) - Political controversy, tight security and mega-construction projects: for Sochi 2014, read Moscow 1980. The Communist Soviet Union has collapsed and the Cold war has ended since Moscow organized the Summer Olympics 34 years ago, but there remain some striking parallels with the Winter Games opening in Sochi on Friday.

Gulag Archipelago: 40 years since Solzhenitsyn's chronicle of terror

Published 40 years ago in Paris, Russian dissident writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn's masterpiece, "The Gulag Archipelago", revealed the shocking truth about Soviet terror and changed the way the USSR was viewed in the West. When Solzhenitsyn's mammoth tome hit bookshops on December 28, 1973 the shock was enormous as it brought to light the horrific scale of the repression under Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin.

Plaque honoring Soviet leader Brezhnev restored in Moscow

MOSCOW (Reuters) - A plaque commemorating late Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev was restored to the facade of his former apartment building on Thursday, a sign of nostalgia in line with President Vladimir Putin's calls to respect all aspects of Russian history. Critics say Brezhnev presided over a period of political repression and economic stagnation and have likened Putin's nearly 14 years in power to his 1964-82 rule - longer than any Soviet leader but dictator Josef Stalin.

HRNK, Holocaust museum in joint work against N. Korean prison camps

By Lee Chi-dong WASHINGTON, Nov. 6 (Yonhap) -- A U.S. human rights group has teamed up with a Holocaust museum in efforts to call attention to North Korea's human rights abuses. The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) said Wednesday it would hold a forum, titled "The Heart of Darkness: North Korea's Hidden Gulag," at the Illinois Holocaust Museum

Russia remembers Gulag chronicler Shalamov

Moscow authorities and activists on Wednesday unveiled a commemorative plaque in memory of author and former Gulag prisoner Varlam Shalamov, who chronicled the horrors of Stalin-era forced labour camps but remained largely underappreciated in Russia. Like fellow ex-Gulag inmate Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Shalamov, who spent nearly two decades in camps, wrote about humans pushed to the brink of endurance in the deadliest of Soviet-era prisons. But despite his genius and poignant story-telling, Shalamov has remained in the shadow of the Nobel laureate Solzhenitsyn.

Russia remembers Gulag chronicler Shalamov

Moscow authorities on Wednesday unveiled a commemorative plaque in memory of author and former Gulag prisoner Varlam Shalamov, who chronicled the horrors of Stalin-era forced labour camps. Like fellow ex-Gulag inmate Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Shalamov, who spent 17 years in camps, wrote about humans pushed to the brink of endurance in the deadliest of Soviet-era prisons. But despite his genius and poignant story-telling, Shalamov has largely remained in the shadow of the Nobel laureate Solzhenitsyn.
Syndicate content