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East, South China seas to factor in Taiwan's war simulations

Taiwan's computer-simulated war games this year will include conflict scenarios involving the East and South China seas, the island's National Security Council said Monday. The council said in a statement President Ma Ying-jeou will participate in the exercise to be held Tuesday and Wednesday. It will be the fourth time for Ma to partake in the annual event since he was elected in 2008.

East, South China seas to factor in Taiwan's war simulations

Taiwan's computer-simulated war games this year will include conflict scenarios involving the East and South China seas, the island's National Security Council said Monday. The council said in a statement President Ma Ying-jeou will participate in the exercise to be held Tuesday and Wednesday. It will be the fourth time for Ma to partake in the annual event since he was elected in 2008.

Taiwan protesters end parliament occupation

Taiwanese protesters ended their occupation of parliament Thursday, three weeks after taking over the main chamber to protest a contentious trade pact with China. "We came here with ideals, now we leave with more burden," student leader Lin Fei-fan said at a press briefing shortly before dozens of demonstrators clad in black t-shirts walked out of the building at around 1000 GMT. Holding sunflowers, the symbol of the movement, the protesters -- mostly young students -- were surrounded and warmly greeted by thousands of supporters as they moved out of the building.

Taiwan President Ma blinks, agrees to protesters' demands

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou agreed Saturday to two of the demands made by opponents of a controversial China trade deal, one day before a mass rally called by the protesters. Twelve days after protesters shut down the legislative branch and stormed the government headquarters, Ma agreed to the demands of demonstrators, numbering around 200 and made up mostly of university students, that the agreement on trade in services signed in June last year be reviewed and voted on clause-by-clause.

Taiwan President Ma blinks, agrees to protesters' demands

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou agreed Saturday to two of the demands made by opponents of a controversial China trade deal, one day before a mass rally called by the protesters. Twelve days after protesters shut down the legislative branch and stormed the government headquarters, Ma agreed to the demands of demonstrators, numbering around 200 and made up mostly of university students, that the agreement on trade in services signed in June last year be reviewed and voted on clause-by-clause.

Taiwanese opponents of China trade pact call mass rally for Sunday

About 200 protesters occupying Taiwan's legislative chamber, which they entered 10 days ago to protest a trade deal with China, called Thursday for a mass protest Sunday to pressure the administration to address the issue. Chen Wei-ting, a leader of the group made up mostly of university students, urged the public to join them Sunday so the administration would respond to their demands.

Taiwan president invites protesters to talk about China trade pact

TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou has invited the leaders of a student protest movement to his office in a bid to resolve an impasse about a controversial trade pact with mainland China. "Without setting any preconditions, President Ma Ying-jeou is willing to invite student representatives to the presidential office for a dialogue about the cross-strait services trade agreement," Lee Jia-fei, Ma's spokesperson, said in a statement.

Ma ready to talk with protesters opposed to Taiwan-China trade pact

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou on Tuesday invited demonstrators occupying the legislative compound to protest a trade deal with China to his office for talks in a bid to resolve the impasse over the pact. Presidential Office Spokeswoman Lee Chia-fei said Ma is willing to talk to leaders of the protesters about issues concerning the agreement on trade in services signed in June last year, if the protesters do not set any precondition.

Taiwan's top prosecutor convicted of leaking secrets

A court Friday sentenced Taiwan's chief prosecutor to 14 months in prison for leaking confidential information to President Ma Ying-jeou about a controversial probe into influence peddling claims last year. Prosecutor-general Huang Shyh-ming was convicted of leaking secrets relating to the investigation late last year, which examined allegations that parliamentary speaker Wang Jin-pyng meddled in a court case implicating an opposition lawmaker, said the Taipei district court.

Truck rams into Taiwan president's office

Taiwan stepped up security measures Saturday after a driver rammed a huge truck through a bullet-proof screen and into the main gate of the presidential office, apparently intentionally, officials said. A man identified only by his family name Chang drove the 35-ton truck through railings, the screen, and up a set of steps before coming stuck in the gate leading to the office's main building, police said.
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