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Spain prehistoric cave art gems reopen to lucky few

With its 14,000-year-old red bison, Spain's Altamira cave paintings reopened to a handful of visitors Thursday, giving them a glimpse of some of the world's most spectacular prehistoric art. Renowned for vivid paintings of beasts and animal-headed humans, the Altamira cave closed in 2002 because breath and microscopic fungi introduced by visitors threatened to ruin the prehistoric paint. On Thursday it reopened for five lucky visitors, chosen by lot from ticket-holders at a nearby museum that houses replicas of the paintings at Santillana del Mar, in the Cantabria region.

Spain prehistoric cave art gems reopen to lucky few

With its 14,000-year-old red bison, Spain's Altamira cave paintings reopened to a handful of visitors Thursday, giving them a glimpse of some of the world's most spectacular prehistoric art. Renowned for vivid paintings of beasts and animal-headed humans, the Altamira cave closed in 2002 because breath and microscopic fungi introduced by visitors threatened to ruin the prehistoric paint. On Thursday it reopened for five lucky visitors, chosen by lot from ticket-holders at a nearby museum that houses replicas of the paintings at Santillana del Mar, in the Cantabria region.

Spain prehistoric cave art gems reopen to lucky few

With its 14,000-year-old red bison, Spain's Altamira cave paintings reopened to a lucky handful of visitors Thursday, giving them a glimpse of some of the world's most spectacular prehistoric art. Renowned for vivid paintings of beasts and animal-headed humans, the Altamira cave closed in 2002 because scientists said the breath from crowds of visitors was damaging the prehistoric paint. On Thursday it reopened for five members of the public, chosen by lot from visitors to a nearby museum that houses replicas of the paintings at Santillana del Mar, in the Cantabria region.

Spain prehistoric cave art gems reopen to lucky few

With its 14,000-year-old red bison, Spain's Altamira cave paintings reopened to a lucky handful of visitors Thursday, giving them a glimpse of some of the world's most spectacular prehistoric art. Renowned for vivid paintings of beasts and animal-headed humans, the Altamira cave closed in 2002 because scientists said the breath from crowds of visitors was damaging the prehistoric paint. On Thursday it reopened for five members of the public, chosen by lot from visitors to a nearby museum that houses replicas of the paintings at Santillana del Mar, in the Cantabria region.

Spain prehistoric cave art gems reopen to lucky few

Some of Europe's most spectacular prehistoric cave paintings reopen for a glimpse to a handful of visitors on Thursday at Altamira in northern Spain after a 12-year closure. Renowned for vivid paintings of bison and animal-headed humans, the rocky cave closed in 2002 because scientists said the breath from crowds of visitors was damaging the prehistoric paint. Now it reopens to small, select groups of visitors who will have to wear masks and overalls while experts assess the impact on the paintings, the culture ministry said.

Spain prehistoric cave art gems reopen to lucky few

Some of Europe's most spectacular prehistoric cave paintings reopen for a glimpse to a handful of visitors on Thursday at Altamira in northern Spain after a 12-year closure. Renowned for vivid paintings of bison and animal-headed humans, the rocky cave closed in 2002 because scientists said the breath from crowds of visitors was damaging the prehistoric paint. Now it reopens to small, select groups of visitors who will have to wear masks and overalls while experts assess the impact on the paintings, the culture ministry said.

Professor who found oldest U.S. cave art says there's more

By Tim Ghianni NASHVILLE, Tennessee (Reuters) - Jan Simek, leader of the team that discovered the oldest known cave art in the United States, says he is far from finished. The 60-year-old science professor at the University of Tennessee still plans to belly crawl through caves or climb atop bluffs in the hope of finding more art in his cave-rich state.

Gov't to build dam for endangered prehistoric engravings

SEOUL, June 16 (Yonhap) -- The government said Sunday it will build a dike-like movable dam in front of a set of prehistoric engravings in the southeastern city of Ulsan to preserve them from being eroded by flood water. The measure, which comes after a decade-long conflict among the central and local governments and residents over how to protect the Bangudae Petroglyphs, is expected to help South Korea's efforts to apply by 2017 to have them added to the UNESCO world heritage list.

5,000 cave paintings discovered in Mexico

Archeologists have found nearly 5,000 cave paintings made by hunter-gatherers in a northeastern Mexico mountain range where pre-Hispanic groups were not known to have existed. The yellow, red, white and black paintings depict humans, deers, lizards and centipedes, suggesting that the groups hunted, fished and gathered food, according to the National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH). They also painted religious, astronomical and abstract scenes and most of the images are very well preserved.

5,000 cave paintings discovered in Mexico

Archeologists have found nearly 5,000 cave paintings made by hunter-gatherers in a northeastern Mexico mountain range where pre-Hispanic groups were not known to have existed. The yellow, red, white and black paintings depict humans, deers, lizards and centipedes, suggesting that the groups hunted, fished and gathered food, according to the National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH). They also painted religious, astronomical and abstract scenes and most of the images are very well preserved.
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