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Japanese mobsters launch own website

Japan's biggest organised crime syndicate has launched its own website, complete with a corporate song and a strong anti-drugs message, as the yakuza looks to turn around its outdated image and falling membership. The clunky-sounding "Banish Drugs and Purify the Nation League" website is an offering from the Yamaguchi-gumi, Japan's largest yakuza grouping.

Japanese mobsters launch own website

Japan's biggest organised crime syndicate has launched its own website, complete with a corporate song and a strong anti-drugs message, as the yakuza looks to turn around its outdated image and falling membership. The clunky-sounding "Banish Drugs and Purify the Nation League" website is an offering from the Yamaguchi-gumi, Japan's largest yakuza grouping.

Japanese mobsters launch own website

Japan's biggest organised crime syndicate has launched its own website, complete with corporate song and a strong anti-drugs message, as the yakuza looks to turn around its outdated image and falling membership. The clunky-sounding "Banish Drugs and Purify the Nation League" website is an offering from the Yamaguchi-gumi, Japan's largest yakuza grouping.

Japan yakuza gangster membership falls to record low

The number of people belonging to Japan's notorious yakuza crime groups fell to an all-time low in 2013, slipping below the 60,000-member mark for the first time on record, police said Thursday. The National Police Agency credited its crackdown on the organised crime syndicates for membership falling to 58,600 last year, down from about 63,200 in 2012. Like the Italian mob or Chinese triads, yakuza syndicates are involved in activities ranging from prostitution and drugs to extortion and white-collar crime.

U.S. blacklists Japanese gangsters over drugs, human trafficking

The U.S. Treasury Department designated four leading members of Japan's largest yakuza crime syndicate on Thursday as subject to economic sanctions, accusing the group of being involved in crimes such as drug and human trafficking. The department said any assets the Yamaguchi-gumi gangsters may have under U.S. jurisdiction will be frozen and U.S. citizens are generally prohibited from doing business with them.

Japan's yakuza mobsters becoming 'Goldman Sachs with guns'

Japanese mobsters driving flash cars purchased with bank loans. Executives bowing in apology for loaning millions to those underworld figures. And high-level officials vowing to squash the crime syndicates, known as yakuza. Japan Inc. is engulfed in its worst mob scandal in years and it's shining a rare light on the links between big business and shadowy organised crime groups usually known for low-brow ventures like extortion and loan sharking.

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Japan woman sues yakuza boss over protection money

A woman is suing the head of Japan's biggest yakuza organised crime group, seeking a refund of protection money paid to gangsters threatening to torch her bar, reports said Wednesday. The plaintiff is claiming that Kenichi Shinoda bears "employer's liability" as the don of the Yamaguchi-gumi because the mobsters were affiliated to his syndicate, broadcaster TBS said, in what is thought to be the first case of its kind.

Japan woman sues yakuza boss over protection money

A woman is suing the head of Japan's biggest yakuza organised crime group, seeking a refund of protection money paid to gangsters threatening to torch her bar, reports said Wednesday. The plaintiff is claiming Kenichi Shinoda bears "employer's liability" as the don of the Yamaguchi-gumi because the mobsters were affiliated to his syndicate, broadcaster TBS said, in what is thought to be the first case of its kind.

Japan's No. 2 yakuza jailed for extortion

A "one-eyed" gangster, the number-two man in Japan's biggest yakuza crime organisation, was convicted of extortion on Friday, winning a high-profile victory for the country's anti-mob police. Kiyoshi "Mekkachi" Takayama, 65, who reputedly lost the use of his eye in a swordfight early in his career, was jailed for six years. His underworld nickname of "Mekkachi" means "one-eyed" in the dialect of western Japan.
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