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S. Korean PM, former Japanese PM voice hope for better bilateral ties

SEOUL, Feb. 13 (Yonhap) -- South Korean Prime Minister Chung Hong-won and former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama expressed hope Thursday that Japan's Abe government would acknowledge Tokyo's colonial aggressions against Korea in the first step to improving ties between the two countries, Chung's office said. Chung and Murayama also agreed during their meeting at the main government complex in Seoul that settling the two countries' shared history based on a correct perception of it is the way to move their bilateral ties forward, the office said in a press release.

Ex-Japan PM Murayama says Abe to uphold 1995 statement

Former Japanese leader Tomiichi Murayama said in Seoul on Wednesday that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has indicated he would "ultimately uphold" an apology Murayama made as prime minister in 1995 for the wartime suffering inflicted by Japan on its Asian neighbors. "I believe he will do what he said," Murayama said in a lecture to a group of South Korean lawmakers. He did not elaborate on when Abe made the remarks. The so-called Murayama Statement is still considered to be Japan's official position.

China urges Japan to 'responsibly' resolve grievances over sex slaves

BEIJING, Feb. 12 (Yonhap) -- China pressed Japan Wednesday to "appropriately and responsibly" resolve long-standing grievances regarding women forced into sexual slavery by Japan's military during World War II. China's foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying made the comments when asked about remarks by former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama, who called for Tokyo to resolve the issue during his visit to South Korea this week.

Ex-Japan PM Murayama says Abe will uphold 1995 statement

Former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama said in Seoul on Wednesday that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said he will "ultimately uphold" a 1995 statement apologizing for the wartime suffering inflicted by Japan on its Asian neighbors. Murayama stopped short of elaborating when Abe made the remark. Abe said in April his Cabinet has not necessarily adopted the statement in its entirety, sparking concern in South Korea over Japan's stance on historical issues.

Ex-Japanese PM says Abe will honor 1995 apology

SEOUL, Feb. 12 (Yonhap) -- Former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama said Wednesday he believes current leader Shinzo Abe will honor a 1995 apology that he issued while in office for the country's colonization of Korea in the early 20th century. The 89-year-old former Japanese leader made the remarks during a speech at the National Assembly amid concern that Abe could refuse to inherit the so-called Murayama statement and a similar apology issued in 1993 by then Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono.

Ex-Japanese PM says Abe will honor 1995 apology

SEOUL, Feb. 12 (Yonhap) -- Former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama said Wednesday he believes current leader Shinzo Abe will honor a 1995 apology that he issued while in office for the country's colonization of Korea in the early 20th century. The 89-year-old former Japanese leader made the remarks during a speech at the National Assembly amid concern that Abe could refuse to inherit the so-called Murayama statement and a similar apology issued in 1993 by then Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono.

Ex-Japanese PM says Abe will honor 1995 apology

SEOUL, Feb. 12 (Yonhap) -- Former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama said Wednesday he believes current Japanese leader Shinzo Abe will honor a 1995 apology that he issued while in office for the country's colonization of Korea in the early 20th century. The 89-year-old former Japanese leader made the remarks during a speech at the National Assembly amid concern that Abe could refuse to inherit the so-called Murayama statement and a similar apology issued in 1993 by then Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono.

Former Japanese PM Murayama visits S. Korea

Former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama arrived in Seoul on Tuesday for a three-day visit and met with three South Korean women who were forced into sexual servitude during World War II later in the day. "Japanese people had forcibly taken us to China. They should make an apology and provide compensation," said Kang Il Chool, one of the three South Korean women. In response, Murayama, 89, wished them good health and shook hands with them. The meeting took place at an exhibition hall at the National Assembly.

Ex-Japanese PM meets former Korean sex slaves

SEOUL, Feb. 11 (Yonhap) -- A former Japanese prime minister, who apologized to victims of Japan's wartime aggression while in office, on Tuesday met three South Korean women forced into sexual slavery for Japanese soldiers during World War II. The 89-year-old former Japanese leader, Tomiichi Murayama, arrived in Seoul earlier in the day for a three-day visit arranged by South Korea's minor opposition Justice Party.

Former Japanese PM Murayama visits S. Korea

Former Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama arrived in Seoul on Tuesday for a three-day visit and met with three South Korean women who were forced into sexual servitude during World War II later in the day. "Japanese people had forcibly taken us to China. They should make an apology and compensation to us," said Kang Il Chool, one of the three South Korean women. The meeting took place at an exhibition hall at the National Assembly. In response, Murayama wished them good health and shook hands with them.
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