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Malala Inc: global operation surrounds Pakistani girl

Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai has become a formidable force for rights in the year since the Taliban shot her, but an equally formidable public relations operation has helped her spread her message. The 16-year-old campaigner for girls' education has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, addressed the UN, published an autobiography and been invited to tea with Queen Elizabeth II, achieving a level of fame more like that of a movie star. On Thursday she won the EU's prestigious Sakharov human rights prize Thursday, drawing a fresh threat of murder by the Taliban.

Nobel Peace Prize for Malala, Congolese doctor or OPCW?

The winner of the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced on Friday, with teenage Pakistani education activist Malala Yousafzai seen as the favourite though her chances could be dimmed by her young age. Just hours before the announcement was due, other hot names making the rounds in Norway were Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). In line with tradition, the chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjoern Jagland, will reveal the laureate's name at 11:00 am (0900 GMT) at the Nobel Institute in Oslo.

Malala wants to be PM, says Nobel would be 'great honor'

Teenage rights activist Malala Yousafzai told an audience in New York Thursday that she would like to become prime minister of Pakistan to "save" the country. In an interview with CNN's Christiane Amanpour at a sold-out public event, she also said winning Friday's Nobel Peace Prize would be a "great honor." Asked about her conflicting dreams of becoming a doctor or a politician, and whether she would like to become premier, Malala said she wanted to help her homeland. "I want to become a prime minister of Pakistan," she told Amanpour to cheers from the audience.

Pakistan's Malala wins EU's Sakharov rights prize

Pakistan's teenage activist Malala Yousafzai, shot by the Taliban for fighting for girls' rights to education, on Thursday was awarded the European Parliament's prestigious Sakharov human rights prize. "Today, we decided to let the world know that our hope for a better future stands in young people like Malala Yousafzai," said the chairman of the conservative European People's Party (EPP), Joseph Daul. The 16-year-old who has become an emblem of the fight against the most radical forms of Islamism has also been nominated for the Nobel peace prize.

Pakistan's Malala wins EU's Sakharov rights prize

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenage activist nominated for Friday's Nobel Peace Prize, was awarded the prestigious Sakharov human rights prize by the European Parliament on Thursday. To thunderous applause announcing the prize, the parliament's president Martin Schulz said "Malala bravely stands for the right of all children to be granted a fair education. This right for girls is far too commonly neglected." The parliament's vote for Malala amid a shortlist of three nominees "acknowledges the incredible strength of this young woman," Schulz added.

Euro lawmakers honor Malala Yousafzai

Strasbourg, France, Oct 10 (EFE).- Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani girl who was shot by Muslim extremists for defending the universal right to education, was selected Thursday as the 2013 recipient of the European Parliament's 2013 Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Expression. "By awarding the Sakharov Prize to Malala Yousafzai, the European Parliament acknowledges the incredible strength of this young woman. Malala bravely stands for the right of all children to be granted a fair education," parliament speaker Martin Schulz said.

Malala a 'powerful symbol of hope': World Bank chief

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim on Thursday called Malala Yousafzai, who survived an assassination attempt for her campaign for girls' schooling, a symbol of hope and courage for the world's children. "For the 400 million children still living in extreme poverty -- including far too many girls and boys who are not in school -- Malala is a powerful symbol of hope," Kim said. "She would not be denied. These children also should not be denied a good education and greater opportunity in life."

Pakistani teenager, shot by Taliban, wins EU human rights prize

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, shot in the head by the Taliban for campaigning for education for girls, won the European Union's annual human rights award on Thursday, beating fugitive U.S. intelligence analyst Edward Snowden. The 16-year-old was attacked last year while on a school bus in northwestern Pakistan, but recovered after medical treatment in Britain. She is also a favorite among experts and betting agencies to be named the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday.

Malala Yousafzai wins top EU human rights award

The European Parliament awarded the 25th Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, its top human rights prize, to Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai on Thursday. The 16-year-old schoolgirl was shot in the head by Taliban fighters while returning home on a school bus in 2012, after she gained international attention for her campaign to secure education for girls in Pakistan. Her life was saved by medical treatment in Britain, where she has been residing under protection since the attack.

Pakistan's Malala wins EU's Sakharov rights prize

Malala Yousafzai, Pakistan's teenage activist, on Thursday was awarded the European Parliament's prestigious Sakharov human rights prize. "Today, we decided to let the world know that our hope for a better future stands in young people like Malala Yousafzai," said the chairman of the conservative European People's Party (EPP). ccr/jmm
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