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Google, IBM earnings send US market lower

US stocks fell modestly on opening Thursday as poor earnings from Google and IBM set the tone despite solid quarterly reports from Goldman Sachs, General Electric and other firms. The weak sentiment was also evident in the overnight IPO of Sina Weibo, the Chinese microblogging service, which was undersubscribed at the low end of its pricing range, raising $286 million. Five minutes into trade, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 22.54 points (0.14 percent) at 16,402.31.

Google takes hit on growth disappointment

Google lost some of its luster Wednesday as quarterly results failed to meet lofty Wall Street expectations, sending its shares down sharply. The California tech giant said its first quarter profit rose 32 percent from a year ago to $3.45 billion. Chief executive Larry Page hailed "another great quarter" for Google, with revenue of $15.4 billion, up 19 percent year on year. "We got lots of product improvements done, especially on mobile. I'm also excited with progress on our emerging businesses," Page said in a statement.

Google posts $3.45 billion first-quarter profit

Google said Wednesday its first quarter profit rose 32 percent from a year ago to $3.45 billion, in results below most Wall Street expectations. "We completed another great quarter. Google's revenue was $15.4 billion, up 19 percent year on year", said chief executive Larry Page. "We got lots of product improvements done, especially on mobile. I'm also excited with progress on our emerging businesses." soe/rl/sst GOOGLE

Google profits grow, but short of expectations

Google said Wednesday its first quarter profit rose 32 percent from a year ago to $3.45 billion, in results below most Wall Street expectations. Chief executive Larry Page hailed "another great quarter" for the tech giant, with revenue of $15.4 billion, up 19 percent year on year. "We got lots of product improvements done, especially on mobile. I'm also excited with progress on our emerging businesses," Page said in a statement. But Google shares tumbled 5.7 percent in after-hours trade to $556.64, suggesting that the growth was below investor forecasts.

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions. Google took a step in that direction this week with the acquisition of Titan Aerospace, a maker of solar-powered drones that can help boost Internet access to remote areas.

Google buys solar-powered drone maker Titan Aerospace

Google Monday announced that it is acquiring Titan Aerospace, a maker of solar-powered drones that could be used to boost Internet access to remote areas. "It's still early days, but atmospheric satellites could help bring Internet access to millions of people, and help solve other problems, including disaster relief and environmental damage like deforestation," said a Google spokesman in an email to AFP. "It's why we're so excited to welcome Titan Aerospace to the Google family." Google did not release the financial terms of the transaction.

Google Glass available in US as of April 15

Google will makes it controversial Internet-linked Glass eyewear available for purchase for a limited time in the United States beginning on April 15. Anyone in the United States with $1,500 to spend on Glass will be able to join the ranks of "explorers" who have gotten to test out the devices prior to them hitting the market, the California-based Internet titan said Thursday in a post at Google+ social network. "Our Explorers are moms, artists, surgeons, rockers, and each new Explorer has brought a new perspective that is making Glass better," Google said in the post.

Internet companies' growing ambitions spook 51 percent of Americans: Reuters/Ipsos poll

By Alexei Oreskovic SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - The personal data gathering abilities of Google, Facebook and other tech companies has sparked growing unease among Americans, with a majority worried that Internet companies are encroaching too much upon their lives, a new poll showed. Google and Facebook generally topped lists of Americans' concerns about the ability to track physical locations and monitor spending habits and personal communications, according to a poll conducted by Reuters/Ipsos from March 11 to March 26.

Google pays $1.4 million fine in Italy over StreetView concerns

MILAN (Reuters) - Google has paid a 1 million euro ($1.4 million) fine imposed by Italy's data protection watchdog over complaints that cars it used to record images on Italian streets in 2010 were not clearly recognizable, the regulator said on Thursday. "Cars belonging to the giant of Mountain View roamed Italy's streets without being entirely recognizable as such, therefore not allowing the people present in those places to decide whether to be photographed or not," it said in a statement, referring to Google's base at Mountain View in California.

Google exits $1,000 stock club after special dividend

US technology giant Google Thursday exited the rarified club of $1,000 stocks after creating a new class of shares that some say could be used to finance acquisitions. Google granted to holders of its existing "A" and "B" class of stock one share of the new non-voting "Class C" stock for each share of the other two classes The special dividend, first announced in January and distributed late Wednesday, operates like a stock split.
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