Connect to share and comment

Hong Kong metro seats may be scrapped for smartphone space

Hong Kong is pondering whether to rip out some seats from overcrowded metro trains to give the city's smartphone-addicted population more room to interact with their devices. The transport and housing bureau has suggested that the MTR Corporation, which operates the underground railway system, consider the move to relieve rush-hour congestion.

Hong Kong metro seats may be scrapped for smartphone space

Hong Kong is pondering whether to rip out some seats from overcrowded metro trains to give the city's smartphone-addicted population more room to interact with their devices. The transport and housing bureau has suggested that the MTR Corporation, which operates the underground railway system, consider the move to relieve rush-hour congestion.

In Rio, exploding manhole injures 1

Keen to show tourists need not fear for their safety ahead of the football World Cup in Brazil this year, Rio authorities have been beefing up police numbers in touristy areas. But muggers aren't the only threat to tourists -- one of whom was hurt Saturday by a rather different species of public nuisance: a flying manhole cover. Police and firefighters said a visitor from the southern state of Santa Catarina was taken to hospital for stitches after a manhole blew its lid and cut him on the leg.

Roman catacombs yield magnificent frescoes, ancient relics

Rome, Nov 25 (EFE).- The cubicle that houses frescoes representing the resurrection of Lazarus is one of the latest, most magnificent discoveries to be found in the Roman Catacombs of Priscilla after five years of archaeological exploration. Lasers have been used to restore these ancient frescoes that increase even more the value of the Catacombs of Priscilla, with their priceless paleochristian works of art that include the first known image of the Holy Mother and Child.

Travel Postcard: 48 hours in Hong Kong for festive fun

By Farah Master HONG KONG, Feb 1 (Reuters) - Gleaming skyscrapers, Michelin-starred noodle stalls, secluded beaches and a buzzing night life all make Hong Kong, a former British colony, the perfect place to soak up some Asian festive fun. Chinese New Year, which starts on February 10 and ushers in the Year of the Snake, is a time when Hong Kong's frenetic pace slows down and even the hardest working executives take time to enjoy traditional dishes such as "nian gao" sticky rice cakes.
Syndicate content