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Hungarian man, 98, dies awaiting trial for Nazi-era crimes

BUDAPEST (Reuters) - A 98-year-old Hungarian man has died awaiting trial on charges of torturing Jews and helping send them to Auschwitz in World War Two, his lawyer said on Monday. Laszlo Csatary, who always denied the accusations, died of pneumonia in a Budapest hospital on Saturday, lawyer Gabor Horvath told Reuters. The Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center named Csatary their most wanted war crimes suspect last year.

Top Nazi war crimes suspect Hungarian Laszlo Csatari dead

Laszlo Csatari, a 98-year-old Hungarian who topped the Simon Wiesenthal Center's list of alleged Nazi war criminals, has died in hospital, his lawyer said Monday. "He died on Saturday morning, he had been treated for medical issues for some time but contracted pneumonia, from which he died," lawyer Gabor Horvath said. Csatari was alleged to have been actively involved in the deportations of thousands of Jews to death camps in World War II from a town in present-day Slovakia.

Top Nazi war crimes suspect Hungarian Laszlo Csatari dead

Laszlo Csatari, a 98-year-old Hungarian who topped the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center's list of alleged Nazi war criminals, has died in hospital, his lawyer said Monday. Csatari was alleged to have been actively involved in the deportations of thousands of Jews to death camps in World War II from a town in present-day Slovakia. pmu/pfe/stu/jmm

Anti-Semitic Finnish paper promises to tone down line

A freely-distributed Finnish paper notorious for its anti-Semitic content, said it would tone down its editorial line, following pressure from the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center. "The contents are to become more commercial and radical articles should be avoided," Juha Kaarkkaainen, editor-in-chief of the Magneettimedia paper, told the Helsingin Sanomat in remarks published Friday. Magneettimedia is primarily distributed via a chain of department stores set up by Kaarkkaainen and is also available on the Internet.

Israeli president honours Latvian Holocaust hero

Israeli President Shimon Peres on Tuesday opened a memorial museum in Riga dedicated to Zanis Lipke, a Latvian Holocaust hero credited with saving dozens of Jews from Nazi death camps. "Lipke symbolises what is best, deepest and truest within people," Peres said at the ribbon cutting ceremony on the banks of the River Daugava. Nearby the museum stands the house in which Lipke and his wife hid Jews away in a tiny cellar during the German Nazi occupation of Latvia from 1941 to 1944.

France bans two far-right extremist groups

France on Wednesday banned two extreme-right groups who were active and sometimes violent during anti-gay marriage protests and have been accused of glorifying the country's war-time collaboration with the Nazis. The dissolution of Nationalist Youth and the "Oeuvre francaise" comes two weeks after the government disbanded three other similar groups implicated in the death last month of a left-wing student in a Paris street brawl.

Resentment in Italy ahead of Nazi's 100th birthday

Ahead of the 100th birthday of one of the last Nazi criminals alive, calls have grown in Italy for him to finally apologise for his role in the massacre of more than 300 people in caves outside Rome at the end of World War II. Erich Priebke, who turns 100 on Monday, was sentenced to life in prison in 1998 for his role in the 1944 Ardeatine caves massacre, in which 335 people, including 75 Jews, were executed by the Nazis as a reprisal for a deadly partisan attack on German soldiers.

French minister orders police action over mayor's Hitler remark to Roma

PARIS (Reuters) - The French interior minister has ordered police in western France to take action against a mayor and lawmaker who allegedly told a group of itinerant Roma, parked illegally near his town, that Hitler had not killed enough of them. Gilles Bourdouleix of the UDI centrist party was recorded by a local newspaper reporter making the comment during an altercation with the group, which had parked more than 100 camping cars on a field near Cholet without a permit.

Nazi-themed cafe in Indonesia to reopen sans swastikas

A controversial Nazi-themed cafe in Indonesia would be reopened with a broader World War II theme -- without the swastika symbols but retaining images of Adolf Hitler, the owner's lawyer said Tuesday. The SoldatenKaffee ("The Soldiers' Cafe") -- ornamented with Nazi-related memorabilia -- was voluntarily shut down on Friday following death threats to the owner Henry Mulyana, who is accused of inciting racial hatred.

Nazi hunters launch German poster campaign

The 2,000 placards displayed in cities including Berlin feature a chilling black-and-white photograph of the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp and the tagline: "Late but not too late."
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