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Ottawa new digital strategy panned by critics as too late and too slow

Ottawa has unveiled a digital strategy it says will keep pace with Canadians' use of technology, but some critics say it's too little and too late. Industry Minister James Moore said Friday he will table the the Digital Privacy Act next week with updated measures to improve protection for Canadians' online privacy and security.

Google pays $1.4 million fine in Italy over StreetView concerns

MILAN (Reuters) - Google has paid a 1 million euro ($1.4 million) fine imposed by Italy's data protection watchdog over complaints that cars it used to record images on Italian streets in 2010 were not clearly recognizable, the regulator said on Thursday. "Cars belonging to the giant of Mountain View roamed Italy's streets without being entirely recognizable as such, therefore not allowing the people present in those places to decide whether to be photographed or not," it said in a statement, referring to Google's base at Mountain View in California.

Judge tosses push for class-action status for lawsuit accusing Google of violating privacy

SAN FRANCISCO - A judge has tossed out an effort to win class-action status for a lawsuit accusing Google of violating the privacy terms of email users. U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh ruled late Tuesday that too many users have too many dissimilar claims to pursue a single class-action lawsuit that could expose the search engine giant to billions of dollars in potential losses.

Google won't face email privacy class action

By Jonathan Stempel (Reuters) - Google Inc won a significant legal victory as a U.S. judge decided not to combine several lawsuits that accuse the Internet search company of violating the privacy rights of hundreds of millions of email users into a single class action.

Google won't face email privacy class action

By Jonathan Stempel (Reuters) - Google Inc won a significant legal victory as a U.S. judge decided not to combine several lawsuits that accuse the Internet search company of violating the privacy rights of hundreds of millions of email users into a single class action.

Promise and peril as wireless companies, gadget makers connect everything

BARCELONA, Spain - We're in the beginning of a world in which everything is connected to the Internet and with one another, while powerful yet relatively cheap computers analyze all that data for ways to improve lives. Toothbrushes tell your mirror to remind you to floss. Basketball jerseys detect impending heart failure and call the ambulance for you. At least that's the vision presented this past week at the Mobile World Congress wireless show in Barcelona, Spain. The four-day conference highlighted what the tech industry has loosely termed "the Internet of things."

Lawsuit against Google over Gmail faces hurdle, U.S. judge says

By Dan Levine SAN JOSE, California (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Thursday said some plaintiffs accusing Google of improperly scanning their email faced a significant hurdle in their attempt to move forward with the lawsuit as a class action.

French court orders Google to display fine for privacy breach

PARIS (Reuters) - Google will have to display on its French search page a notice saying it has been fined by the local data-protection watchdog over how user information is tracked and stored, France's top administrative court ruled on Friday. The U.S. search engine said it would comply with the order but would keep fighting the 150,000-euro ($204,000) fine issued last month by privacy watchdog CNIL.

Turkey's parliament adopts Internet restrictions

Turkey's lower house of parliament late Wednesday adopted a bill that would increase state control over the Internet, to the concern of the opposition and rights groups, Turkish media reported. The text would notably permit the government telecoms agency to block access to websites without court authorisation if they are deemed to violate privacy or with content seen as "insulting". pa/rmb/erf

Changes coming to what can be reported about deaths of Alberta kids in care

EDMONTON - Alberta's human services minister said Wednesday there will be changes to open up public reporting of deaths of children in government care. "The bottom line is I commit to the release of information," Manmeet Bhullar said on the final day of a two-day discussion on the topic. "I'm just asking the experts, 'How do we protect others in the system while we do it?' "There are some pieces (of the existing legislation) that my gut says just don't make sense."
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