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China military says faces 'complex' task keeping secrets

BEIJING (Reuters) - China's military faces a "severe and complex" task in maintaining secrecy, especially given the widespread use of the internet and mobile communications, and needs to ensure security is tightened, a top military paper said on Wednesday. Secrecy is needed to ensure that the Chinese army is capable of both waging war and winning, the People's Liberation Army Daily said, citing a document approved by President Xi Jinping and issued by the powerful Central Military Commission.

Washington Post, Guardian win Pulitzer Prize for Snowden leak reports

The Washington Post and The Guardian US won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for public service on Monday for reporting on the U.S. National Security Agency's secret surveillance programs from documents leaked by Edward Snowden. Pulitzer judges praised the Guardian's coverage for sparking debate on issues of security and privacy and the Post for helping explain how the surveillance programs "fit into the larger framework of national security."

Top U.S. lawmaker: intelligence top priority in defense bill

By Patricia Zengerle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The chairman of the U.S. House Armed Services Committee said on Thursday that intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities would be top priorities as the panel puts together this year's massive defense policy bill. "If you don't know what somebody else is doing, you don't even know what your risks are," U.S. Representative Buck McKeon said during a meeting with reporters.

S. Korea pushes to buy 10 low-altitude radars from Israel

By Kim Eun-jung SEOUL, April 9 (Yonhap) -- South Korea is pushing to buy about 10 low-altitude radars from Israel to better detect small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and thereby counter threats posed by North Korean drones, military officials said Wednesday. The military has been hastily preparing measures to step up its surveillance capability, in the wake of the discovery of three small UAVs near the tensely guarded border with North Korea in recent weeks.

N. Korean drones prompt Seoul to boost surveillance

By Kim Eun-jung SEOUL, April 2 (Yonhap) -- South Korea is seeking to improve its surveillance capabilities to deal with rising military threats, following the discovery of two drones that Seoul believes belong to Pyongyang near the border, military officials said Wednesday.

N. Korean drones prompt Seoul to boost surveillance

By Kim Eun-jung SEOUL, April 2 (Yonhap) -- South Korea is seeking to improve its surveillance capabilities to deal with rising military threats, following the discovery of two drones that Seoul believes belong to Pyongyang near the border, military officials said Wednesday.

Suspected N. Korean drones prompt Seoul to boost surveillance

By Kim Eun-jung SEOUL, April 2 (Yonhap) -- South Korea is seeking to improve its surveillance capabilities to deal with military threats from North Korea following the discovery of two drones near the inter-Korean border, military officials said Wednesday.

Coalition wants US to end bulk data sweep

More than 40 activist organizations and companies called Tuesday for an overhaul of US government surveillance authority that goes beyond President Barack Obama's proposal. The coalition said Obama's proposal to end bulk collection of telephone data by the National Security Agency is positive, but does not go far enough. Any reforms should "prohibit bulk collection for all types of data, not just phone records," the groups said in a letter to the White House and US lawmakers.

Obama says NSA to cease bulk data collection in US

President Barack Obama said Thursday the US government will end its bulk collection of Americans' telephone records, aiming to defuse a controversy over mass surveillance. "The best path forward is that the government should not collect or hold this data in bulk," Obama said, as he unveiled a formal proposal to reform procedures for the National Security Agency. ico-rl/dc

Former US president Carter uses snail mail to evade NSA

Former US president Jimmy Carter has admitted he uses snail mail to evade monitoring by the National Security Agency and that he feels such surveillance methods have been abused. "When I want to communicate with a foreign leader privately, I type or write a letter myself, put it in the post office, and mail it," Carter said with a laugh, as he was questioned on the matter on NBC's "Meet the Press" program. "I have felt that my own communications are probably monitored," he said on the Sunday show.
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