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Sunderland's Di Canio ducks fascism questions

(Reuters) - New Sunderland manager Paolo Di Canio described the controversy over his appointment as "ridiculous and pathetic" and refused to answer questions about whether he held fascist beliefs in his first news conference on Tuesday. Di Canio, 44, replaced Martin O'Neill at the relegation-threatened Premier League team on Sunday, a move that sparked the resignation of a British former government minister from the club's board.

Football: Fascism row to the fore as Di Canio faces press

New Sunderland manager Paolo Di Canio on Tuesday faced a barrage of questions about his support for fascism, after his appointment prompted a club director to quit and outrage among many fans. The club in northeast England, a former industrial area built on coal mining, ship-building and heavy industry, also provoked the ire of one trade union, which has demanded that they remove its banner from their Stadium of Light ground.

Football: Fascism row to the fore as Di Canio faces press

New Sunderland manager Paolo Di Canio on Tuesday faced a barrage of questions about his support for fascism, after his appointment prompted a club director to quit and outrage among many fans. The club in northeast England, a former industrial area built on coal mining, ship-building and heavy industry, also provoked the ire of one trade union, which has demanded that they remove its banner from their Stadium of Light ground.

Football: Fascism row to the fore as Di Canio faces press

New Sunderland manager Paolo Di Canio on Tuesday faced a barrage of questions about his support for fascism, after his appointment prompted a club director to quit and outrage among many fans. The club in northeast England, a former industrial area built on coal mining, ship-building and heavy industry, also provoked the ire of one trade union, which has demanded that they remove its banner from their Stadium of Light ground.

Football: Di Canio defined by explosive style

As Swindon goalkeeper Wes Foderingham stormed angrily off the pitch just 21 minutes into his side's clash against Preston, it quickly became clear that Paolo Di Canio's time in management would be no less eventful than his colourful and controversial playing career. Not for the first time in his life, Di Canio, who on Sunday was named as the surprise choice to replace Martin O'Neill as Sunderland manager, let his emotions get the better of him during League One Swindon's trip to Deepdale in September last year.

Football: Di Canio must end fascism link say racism group

New Sunderland manager Paolo Di Canio has been warned by anti-racism campaigners that he must distance himself from extremist political beliefs. Di Canio was due to take his first training session with Sunderland's players on Monday following his surprise appointment as replacement for sacked Sunderland boss Martin O'Neill 24 hours earlier. But the Italian's arrival at the Stadium of Light has already stirred controversy due to his far right-wing politics.

Football: Di Canio named Sunderland boss, ex-FM quits club

Paolo Di Canio was named the new coach of Premier League strugglers Sunderland on Sunday, a move which sparked the resignation from the club board of an ex-foreign minister outraged by the Italian's right-wing views. Di Canio replaced Martin O'Neill, who was sacked on Saturday. "Sunderland AFC have confirmed the appointment of Paolo Di Canio as Head Coach on a two-and-a-half year deal," said a club statement.

Football: Di Canio named Sunderland boss, ex-FM quits club

Paolo Di Canio was named the new coach of Premier League strugglers Sunderland on Sunday, a move which sparked the resignation from the club board of an ex-foreign minister outraged by the Italian's right-wing views. Di Canio replaced Martin O'Neill, who was sacked on Saturday. "Sunderland AFC have confirmed the appointment of Paolo Di Canio as Head Coach on a two-and-a-half year deal," said a club statement.

Hurt Di Canio hits back at "unfair" accusations

LONDON (Reuters) - Italian Paolo Di Canio, whose appointment as Sunderland manager sparked the resignation of a former Government minister from the club's board, said on Monday he was hurt by unfair accusations against him. Despite previously working as the manager of League One (third tier) club Swindon Town and playing in both England and Scotland during a long playing career, news of his appointment rekindled interest in the remarks he made to Italian news agency ANSA in 2005 when he said: "I am a fascist, not a racist."

Football: Di Canio resigns after deadline passes

Colourful Italian coach Paolo di Canio resigned as manager of financially-troubled English League One side Swindon on Monday after the Football League failed to grant approval to the prospective new owners of the club by a deadline he had imposed. The 44-year-old former AC Milan, Juventus, Lazio and Celtic striker had been incensed earlier this month after the club's best player Matt Ritchie was sold to promotion rivals Bournemouth for £500,000 on transfer deadline day.
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